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Shark Tank
Shark Tank
TV Series
Ambitious entrepreneurs present their breakthrough business concepts.
Casts
Series cast summary:
Kevin O'Leary Kevin O'Leary - Himself - Shark 207 episodes, 2009-2019
Phil Crowley Phil Crowley - Announcer 207 episodes, 2009-2019
Robert Herjavec Robert Herjavec - Himself - Shark 200 episodes, 2009-2019
Mark Cuban Mark Cuban - Himself - Shark 192 episodes, 2011-2019
Lori Greiner Lori Greiner - Herself - Shark 163 episodes, 2012-2019
Daymond John Daymond John - Himself - Shark / - 164 episodes, 2009-2019
Barbara Corcoran Barbara Corcoran - Herself - Shark / - 149 episodes, 2009-2019

Shark Tank

Kevin O'Leary has a net worth of $450 million. Robert Herjavec's net worth is $200 million. Daymond John's is $250 million. Lori Greiner's is $50 million. Barbara Corcoran's is $40 million. Kevin Harrington's is $450 million. Mark Cuban, with a net worth of $3.5 billion, beats the rest of the sharks' assets combined.

Kevin O'Leary was the only Shark to have appeared in every episode, up until the premiere of the ninth season.

Although the pitches seen on television last for about ten minutes, they actually last for about one hour. They also must start with 30 seconds of silence to gather a camera shot of the whole set.

Over $100 million has been invested to businesses the sharks pitch in to.

Shark Tank (2009) was nominated for the 2018 Emmy Award in the Structured Reality Program category, but lost to Queer Eye (2018).

Ionzar
Ionzar
As an entrepreneur myself, I've dealt with investors and VC's, and I can honestly say that the Sharks are a great representation of real-life. They come across as harsh, money-grubbing, and greedy most of the time. But the kicker is that in the world of investing, you have to be this way and more, or else you get railroaded by the guys willing to go the extra mile. Often times I feel the Sharks do a great job of rooting out the good businesses from the ones that likely will crash and burn. I've observed that they'll usually ask for a majority percentage in the company if the presenter is somebody who hasn't really proved themselves in the wide market. To me this is absolutely fair, because the return is that the presenter has the opportunity to work with a partner who's made millions or billions of dollars, and provides a wealth of knowledge and experience. In short, if you're a start-up or recent start-up, you might not want to go on this show, because you'll likely give up more of your company than you want to. If you have a tried and true product, and need extra cash to expand or market yourself, this is a great opportunity. For viewers with interests in business or who want to learn more about business, I highly recommend Shark Tank. It's educational, smart, creative, and ultimately worthy of your time.
WinDImmortaL
WinDImmortaL
Shark Tank isn't your average reality show. It isn't your average show period, because Shark Tank offers a lot more than contestants asking the Sharks for money and making deals. That is the plot essentially, basically the American Idol for struggling entrepreneurs. The entrepreneurs make a pitch for an investment, the Sharks decide whether or not to invest, and if they do, they may have a Shark fight and try to outbid each other, sometimes aggressively so. But the beautiful thing is the wide variety of entrepreneurs there are on the show. There have been things pitched from action movies to fart-resistant underwear to surgically implantable bluetooth into your ear, and everything in between.

Many people's stories are touching, some even evoking an emotional response from me which is quite difficult. On the flip side, some are horrifically bad and hilarity ensues watching the Sharks rip them to shreds. The greatest thing about the show is how real it is. You can tell that the Sharks have genuine personalities and as you get to know them, their interactions become a lot funnier and a lot more personal. The show didn't have a consistent group of Sharks until season 3-4, but it's been fairly consistent since then, and their chemistry is absolutely perfect. Especially when a brilliant entrepreneur comes along with an amazing product and every Shark wants in. That's when things get explosive and at one point so intense that 3 of them walked off set.

It's also a phenomenal learning experience. Now, I know nothing about business. At least I didn't prior to watching Shark Tank, and the learning curve is quite simple. Once you understand the concept of valuation and risk assessment it's pretty easy to follow the mathematics of it. So for example, if someone came in asking for $100k for 10% equity in the company, they're valuing the company at $1 million because it would take 10 times the growth in order to pay back the investor. That's how the Sharks think, so understandably when people come in asking for $500k for 5% equity in their company ($10 million valuation), the Sharks expect some damn good sales to back that up. Since the show is entirely based around the Sharks, I figured I'd go down the list and express how I feel about them individually.

Robert Herjavec - A cyber security genius, Robert is the most likable guy on planet Earth. He's unmatched in his kindness, fondness for animals and his blind willingness to try out any entrepreneur's idea. He's a father with the heart of a child, and most importantly he's an excellent businessman. Being the nicest Shark, it's really fun watching Robert get down and dirty which does happen occasionally between fellow Sharks and entrepreneurs alike, and he can definitely hold his own against some of the other, bigger Sharks.

Lori Greiner - Queen of QVC bombshell Lori Greiner proves to be one of the more passive-aggressive and manipulative Sharks. Her charming persona is easy bait for entrepreneurs, especially paired with her humble smile, welcoming voice, and undeniable good looks. She's also an intelligent investor, using her TV leverage to score a lot of deals. She appears to be warm and fuzzy on the outside, but she definitely has a mischievous underbelly to her that sparks many unforgettable arguments amongst the Sharks.

Barbara Corcoran - Real estate mogul and a cunning snake when it comes to business. It's lovely watching the enjoyment she gets out of screwing over the other Sharks, and it's a testament to her marketing skills because she is a phenomenal salesperson. You can tell that she's actually a great person at heart, constantly looking after her entrepreneurs and taking them under her wing. Also, her altercations with Mr. O'Leary are unmatched. Speaking of...

Kevin O'Leary a.k.a. Mr. Wonderful - The Sharkiest of Sharks, this man lives and breathes money. He's a wine connoisseur and knows everything about everything. He's the epitome of both a venture capitalist and a wine snob. He's blunt, he's rude, unforgiving, ruthless, but most of all, he's hilarious. I can't count the times I got stomach pains from laughing at the things Kevin says. Whether it's about complaining about his tastevin (which is a story in itself) or blatant dry sarcasm, everything this man says is pure gold. He's also a brilliant salesman and an aggressive investor, known for his infamous royalty deals.

Daymond John - This laid-back fashion guru can be quiet and unassuming one minute but eloquent and aggressive the next. He's very smart and chooses his investments wisely. He's truly an interesting character because he's insightful and understanding of entrepreneurs, going so far as to follow one out of the Tank to convince he and his wife that he wants the best for their family.

Mark Cuban - The Big Kahuna, Mavericks owner, tech king, down-to-earth billionaire. This man is one of the hardest workers and smartest people on the planet. He's a listener first and foremost, speaking only when he needs information or when something needs to be said. He also causes the most controversy between the Sharks because his net worth ($3 billion) is far higher than anyone else's so he has the freedom to jump into someone's deal last minute and steal it right from under their nose. He has the money to spare, and while some of his investments are crapshoots, his thought process on getting to his conclusions are truly fascinating. He gives the show character, as every Shark does, and the chemistry between them all is incredible.

There's not much else to say. I've learned so much by watching this show, and as is said many times in the show, Shark Tank is proof that the American dream is still alive and well.
Winn
Winn
"Sharks" is an interesting concept. It's a "reality TV show" and the reality is that budding entrepreneurs come before a collection of 5 experienced entrepreneurs and make a pitch, hoping to attract dollars and guidance from one or more of the so-called sharks. The sharks change from time to time, but the main ones are Robert Herjavec, Daymond John, and Kevin O'Leary. Barbara Corcoran alternates with Lori Greiner as the token woman. Kevin Harrington was an early contributor but lately Mark Cuban has been the 5th member.

  • Herjavec (1963) is from Canada and made his money in internet security. - John (1969) is from NYC and made his money through FUBU clothing line. - O'Leary (1954) is a Canadian and made his money inventing SoftKey and later The Learning Company. he usually plays "the bad guy" - Corcoran (1949) is from New Jersey and made her money in the NYC real estate market - Greiner is called "The Queen of QVC" where she created more than 400 products. She is often the "sweet one" - Cuban (1958) is from Pittsburg and owns the NBA Dallas Mavericks and Landmark Pictures. - Harrington (1957) is famous for creating the first "infomercial"


Each episode, guests pitch their products and generally speaking, they are critiqued by the sharks often in a hostile and demeaning manner. That's part of the "show biz" flare, but many people will find it objectionable.

As a learning vehicle, the show offers some good examples of how to (and how not to) present their ideas. It's well worth viewing for anyone interested in business and anyone who thinks that at some time they may have to pitch their own ideas.
Dainris
Dainris
Even though I do agree with the other reviews that the sharks can be a little hard on some of the people making their sales pitches, I have to disagree with the fact that this would be enough of a reason to not watch the show to begin with. Some of the people who do have legitimately good ideas do not get any offers. This seems to be for rather obvious reasons some times, the people don't want to let the sharks in on the entire business, they over estimate the value of their ideas, etc. But on the other hand, even if these people walk away with out a deal, they do get something of great value having been on the show. They get national attention which can (and has) led to other investors for their ideas. I like to watch the show just to see all the creative ideas people pitch to the sharks.
Frdi
Frdi
If you really want to plug into the entrepreneurship some day you should definitely check this show out. You will develop the insight of a venture capitalist mind and yes they are going to be rude in the real life too.

You can learn about the kind of mistakes you might make which might cost you a great opportunity.

Besides business insights the show also offer entertainment of it's own style.

so check out few episodes it's worth watching!

for people who are upset about the greedy behavior of sharks try to put yourself in the investors shoe's and imagine how will you behave if it's your hard earned money in there!
Dagdardana
Dagdardana
I used to like this show, I really did. However the incredible arrogance shown by the sharks is sometimes just hard to watch. I realize that the arrogance goes with the territory of who they are and some of it can be expected but it just gets to be too much. I just watched an episode with a salesman whom ALL of the sharks believed had a good idea and the guy was great. Mark decided he didn't want to make the deal only for the fact that the salesman didn't jump at his offer immediately. He then goes on to scold the man for not "closing" the deal as a salesman should and of course said no. This happens often on the show. They claim that its not personal and its only business, however, when the sharks feel slighted or the people don't jump on their offers immediately, they scold and berate their "selling" abilities. It has gotten more and more hypocritical and for that reason alone, I'm not watching anymore. It's just my personal opinion and I'm sure many others feel differently, but I felt deeply enough about it to write this.
Gravelblade
Gravelblade
This is a pretty good show. There are five sharks, each of whom are successful business men. Different entrepreneurs come in and pitch their product, and the sharks decide whether they want to invest in them. It is a great show for figuring out how to start a business. There are some fantastic ideas and fantastic ways that the people first got the money to start their business that are inspiring. However the sharks... Mark Cuban is in my opinion the best shark. When a product is BS, he knows it and tells them he's out. But sometimes, he further demeans them in a way which is almost painful to watch. Same with Daymond sometimes. Kevin O' Leary is truly the worst. He keeps making awful analogies about how his money is his soldiers and other stupid stuff like that. This is a terrific show, however the arrogance of the sharks is sometimes over the top and becomes annoying to watch.

7/10
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
Week after week the sharks are seated at their thrones and relish looking down at the people offering them a piece of their business as if they were worthless peasants. They expect these people to grovel under the hot lights and enjoy watching the beads of sweat building up on their faces. The boorish "sharks" usually support each other and fall in line as they feed off each other's arrogance. No matter how innovative the product or how creative the marketing strategies, they will find something wrong with it and if the victim...I mean entrepreneur..fails to practically kiss their behind, they will be summarily rejected. You just hope that one of the contestants would loudly let loose with a string of obscenities and spit at them. I seriously doubt that they would be beheaded for that.
Gavidor
Gavidor
The title of this show is exactly accurate. When anyone brings an original idea to this show, they are being fed to the sharks. That is because these sharks did not get here by being nice people. They make money the old fashioned way, by being ruthless competitors who are here to evaluate ways they can make money from the fish being fed to them.

Do they accomplish this? Yes, in spades. They ask pointed questions which are in line with their best interests. Their questions are totally grounded on the principles of how can they make money from the visitors idea.

This show is a public service. It shows you how ruthless business people operate. No disclaimers are needed here. This is it. Nobody who comes into this should expect any sympathy from the panel, they are truly sharks. When they make a deal, they have stripped the victim to the bone.
Adoranin
Adoranin
To begin I feel the pull of the show has gone sour. I feel that the cast and all that they stand for has become so...messed up toward each other as well as the viewers and I believe it's lost everything it had going for it. They once upon a time were kind to the seller and to each other but in late episodes they have become so stuck on themselves and superior to the other sharks as well as to the seller. They have become for a lack of a better word. A- holes. All of them. They think of themselves as gods when in reality they have not as much money as a lot of the wealthier people in the u.s. let me just start by saying "Look sharks, if your out, then shut it!!" and stop saying stupid mean repulsive things about the shark giving the offer? Why do you have to open your mouth...remember?...your out so shut up!!! Because I'm very sure in one episode you offended a 13 yr old girl by saying what you said. YOU ARE NOT GODS' and need to stop acting as if you are so superior to your watchers and to the people needing help because ALL of you were at some point in their shoes so who are you to act superior to them? All of the sharks now cause me not to watch the show because of how they all act toward the seller. It's not something I want to watch. Even if what they have is a bad idea you do NOT have to act like they are stupid or ignorant and like you are so far ahead of them. To end this I will say I used to like the show, back when they would let every shark make an offer but now it's as if you don't take my offer right after I give it then "I'm out" which is extremely ridiculous. Grow up children. That is the reason they are on the show. They want the best deal and offer they don't want to hear one crappy shark offer a crappy deal and feel like they have to take it because if they don't then that shark is out no matter what. I would never go on your show because of just that. Also, I will never watch the show again because of that. Why would anyone go on the show I wonder, when all it would do is make them feel like crap about themselves and feel like they have got to take the first, worst offer, or that stupid childish shark, is out. He/she is out because of a pity party they have for themselves because they lost to another shark. I won't watch the sharks any more, and all of my family agrees, As well as everyone I talk to about this.

Guess what sharks....were out.
Kitaxe
Kitaxe
This show is a disgrace. One initially approaches it from the perspective that one might--just might--learn something about business: after all, fantastically wealthy people (who presumably earned their money through ingenuity and razor-sharp judgment) are--on live {as it were} TV, no less--making life-or-death decisions about real companies.

So much for the hype. Now comes the reality . . .

One shark is ruder than the next. Each shark can scarcely wait for the next opportunity to tell the world how astute, accomplished, and demonically brilliant he is. I wonder how they would feel if Bill Gates showed up and--with pocket change--bought and sold these clowns and sent them to the poorhouse on a remote planet. Their behavior is monstrous: they seem interested only in squeezing the gonads of everyone who comes before them, offering pennies on the dollar despite legitimate valuations.

(Since, admittedly, many of the would-be entrepreneurs' ideas are beyond poor, I wonder why the sharks would even invite them onto the show in the first place--unless to provide themselves even cheaper, easier fodder {they don't want to risk insulting someone with a brain, as that may backfire}--but I digress . . .)

Unfortunately, few and far between are the entrepreneurs who have the guts to put the sharks in their place . . . for, it is also true that the ability to suck backside can, after all, be an important ingredient in garnering success. But, IMHO, most of the minnows could--and should--do far better than to trot their wares before these abject buffoons who specialize in self-embarrassment, showcasing the very worst that entrepreneurial America has to offer.

I find myself considering the true entrepreneurs of the past--the likes of Andrew Carnegie and Theodore Roosevelt, who recognized from the tenderest of physical ages that their tremendous wealth carried with it an equally tremendous responsibility and obligation toward society . . . and I cry for these rapacious ne'er-do-wells who perform on my TV screen much as monkeys at the zoo will happily play with their own feces for the amusement of the crowds.
Ballardana
Ballardana
For British viewers, this show is basically Dragon's Den. Identical concept, almost identical execution.

The things that are different are all improvements; the title is better - makes more sense to westerners. There is no annoying presenter doing pieces to camera. The dragons... sorry, sharks are billionaires, and every investment that they make results in multi-million dollar revenue for the entrepreneurs, and the amounts that they invest are often way bigger too, making the whole thing a higher stakes proposition than the humbler British version, and thus more entertaining.

Also, the sharks switch around, so it's not always the same five, but over the course of a season you get to know them all, so it's still comfortably familiar. And they're mostly likeable (like the British ones) but way ruder and a bit funnier.

Overall, it's Dragon's Den, but better.
Goltikree
Goltikree
I love this show. Robert is my favorite. He's such a sweetheart without sacrificing his business-focused mindset, Mark Cuban is the GOAT, and I'd respect Kevin more if he would let other people finish and didn't pride himself on being a jerk. His accomplishments are so impressive but he's so abrasive and rude that I don't care about what he's accomplished because he's not someone I want to know or trust with my business. Just because you're successful doesn't mean you get a pass to be an insufferable butthead.
BOND
BOND
Normally, I despise reality shows. They require no intelligence and they are boring and annoying at the same time. I really don't understand why are they so popular. This however, is an exception. I really like the ideas the investors present to the sharks. Sometimes they get accepted, sometimes they don't. It's really thrilling. This is the only reality show I enjoy and like.
Brariel
Brariel
Sharks kill to eat as all animals do. These people are just vicious school yard greedy bullies. These people are wealthy because they're thieves. They are the lowest of the low. Lower than slugs. They just pounce on people who are just trying make a buck and they just devour them mercilessly. How can they be that way is beyond me. The worst of them is the billionaire Mark Cuban. He has no conscience. There is an honored place in hell just waiting for him. Few humans are as vicious as he is. Thought I'd watch the show to learn how to make some money to improve my life. I rather be a beggar than be like one of those people. They will rot in hell.
Topmen
Topmen
I started watching this show not expecting to develop a very low opinion of the series but that is what happened after watching it for a few months with family members in the living room. At best, I think the sharks on the show only have the right to be called complete selfish idiots and their behavior is not only harming many of society's victims in domestic abuse, workplace management, and even ongoing violent white collar crime, they actually are harming their own image as you can document with the synopsis of Robert Herjavec's attempted suicide publication that he himself discussed in interviews. It certainly does not surprise me that people at petty and disgusting as those on this show could think they have nothing left to live for with all their money. They are 100% giving many monsters the needed impetus to beat their wives, sicken their children, and ultimately fire good employees that they like to bash, leaving many horribly unemployed even with families.

The reality is in this country shows like this are somehow applauded and not recognized for sick, lame, and pathetic. When you watch this show for a long time, you see that the contests look like they are sick to their stomachs, and not just obviously very uncomfortable. It's like watching a show from another era with a nasty dictator who will look at the kindest and complete people and decide to shame them for not even what could be wrong with anything about them, but just whatever the dictator wants to say that often is not even based in reality. The saddest part of the show is when you feel horrified for the latest insult someone said, like when Kevin O'Leary told someone with a dog nutrition bar that it is "poop on a stick" or when he told a completely blind man with a visor, "you are not dead but you are not really alive," or even when he said to one of the most competent presenters according to Barbara and Mark Cuban on the show, "What if the bigger companies squash you like the cockroach that you are?" and then realize that the other sharks actually are not being sincere when they start to apologize for the behavior of the comments of Leary or someone else and then say something even more sick or ridiculous to the presenter to show they actually aren't giving a crap about their behavior either and are totally faking feeling mortified for the sharks who act insanely. There is just no redemption in watching a show about American circus clowns feeding off the work and pride of well meaning entrepreneurs who sadly never have the nerve to put the sharks in their place. The unknown statistics that this show is creating in the American circus of murder, violence, and workplace racism and total insanity will forever be unknown. For now, I hope the sharks lose as many professional credits and lasting friendships for being such utter classless and monstrous participants in siphoning off the faith and good will of American workers and families watching the show. I hope everyone watching the show can learn that no matter how much money you have, you still ultimately only have how much value you put into your own self as these clowns ultimately display as an important lesson when they feel personally threatened enough by intellect or looks of the participants to need to try to humiliate them despite being so wealthy. I also hope watchers of the show begin to research how bogus not only the lack of employee rights are in this country compared to almost all of Europe and even major Asian countries like Japan and Singapore, but really we have no rights in our medical field even as an off shoot of catering to sick, psychopaths like this and it is 100% true that everyone in this country who gets terminal diseases such as cancer will never once be told that there was a Nobel Peace Prize given in 1931 for oxygen's ability to stop the growth of cancer so fake "professionals" like the show's sharks can continuing "professionally" ruining all American life and further dreams. That's what the show's mentality is supporting--low level murder and then ultimately the loss of all rights in this corporate system like medical freedom for even the wealthiest of doctors trying to help anyone or their patients. In this country that likes shows like this, doctors will lose their medical license if they even mention "Otto Warbug and the Nobel Peace Prize for the halt of the growth of cancer cells" because clowns like this control the entire medical practice and think that like the pons they insult, reality can be reduced to crap as the sharks so often praise discussing.
Xangeo
Xangeo
I know I know, shows like this are light entertainment. They are no business school. That said, they show very clearly how America got into a terrible recession, now lessons were not learnt and how not to do business.

It launched with the mission to be an antidote to the recession, to show how business can boom and flourish in tough times. However it fails to learn from the mistakes and instead dives straight back into the sort of behaviour that caused the crisis in the first place.

The sharks make for fun TV, and vary from respectful to hateful. Kevin is one of the worst for denigrating guests but weirdly having watched three seasons he is one of the most sensible and if you read through the bluster there is some decency. But decency is few and far between.

  • The sharks want it ALL. Equity stakes of up to 80% sometimes (100% even offered). They don't want to partner and encourage entrepreneurs, they want to take control and reduce any drive from the pitchers.


  • They are bullies. They often zero respect for fellow humans and business people. Yes you have more money - but that doesn't remove common decency. Frequent tantrums like withdrawing their offer as the guest didn't answer quick enough (this is people's lives that they are deciding under the spotlights) or placing arbitrary time limits to rush decision making are completely unacceptable.


  • The pitchers spend SO much money before they even hit the den. Hundreds of thousands on development and patents before they've even tested the market. This is a dangerous lesson that is perpetuated in America - and lines the pockets of patents lawyers. Hence they come into the tank indebted and desperate before they've even sold a product.


  • Most deals fall through. Having read up all the pitches, deals tend to fall through - as once the TV excitement has gone the sharks lose interest (and in fairness, sometimes the pitchers too). What's really bad is sometimes a shark will outbid another shark in a fit of arrogance - only to then let it drop after the show. The other investor may have added value but they take the view of "If it can't be mine, it can't be anyone's".


And - the big test of time - most of the companies have disappeared from the first three seasons. Investment or not, they nearly all die. Which is a damning assessment of the influence of the sharks, the power of TV advertising and the spirit that the show is trying to portray.

Yes there's been a couple of big hits, but given the amount of product pitches I'd say it's probably below average for the normal business success rate. Shark Tanks is almost a place where products gone to die.

Really it's a lesson how not to do business: become indebted, treat people like dirt, bully people, push out other investors for the hell of it... but it makes for okay TV. Just don't use it as a lesson in business.
Dagdalas
Dagdalas
Dennis O'Leary is not 5'91/2". He was very close to me at an event and I am 5'4" and was wearing 3" heels. He was barely my height. Why lie, O'Leary?

I mean Kevin, not Dennis *hiccaauuooup*
Fenritaur
Fenritaur
I've watched this show for years, and I've watched people come and go here. While I am engaged by the entrepreneurial nature of this show, I am disappointed by the disturbing behavior that occurs between the "businessmen" and "businesswomen" on this show. Every episode, I hope that this show has "grown up" in its appreciation of women's leadership. And every time I watch, I am disappointed. The men on this show continue to interrupt the women, leaving the women waiting for an opportunity to speak. It's embarrassing for our culture in this day and age. I honor the women on this show as I relate to their position. I am embarrassed for the men who still don't "get it" Shame on you, Shark Tank men.
Gunos
Gunos
Great concept. I think this show is superior to Dragons Den in a lot of ways. Also, I love Kevin O'Leary. The popular opinion might be that he's too shrewd, but it makes the show more entertaining and realistic. One of the things I don't quiet get is how some of the sharks such as Lori (worth several million) are supposed to compete with Mark Cuban (worth billions). Mark could buy everything he wanted and it would't affect his net worth
Mavivasa
Mavivasa
First let me say I like the show and watch it. It's entertaining and I like all the Shark Tank investors (yes even Kevin, Lorrie is actually my least favorite, she seems the most fake of the bunch). I've watched it a long time and there lies the problem. The more I've watched it, the more I've come to realize that I just have a hard time believing all the outcomes. Some of this stuff that is invested in just leaves me baffled on "why". I think a lot of it is staged. About the only thing that would convince me otherwise is if they also showed the failures of investments. All they show are successes which leaves me to conclude Hollywood is calling the shots. Probably would make good episodes just to focus on the outcomes and the stories of what the Shark Tank investors really went through in their experiences, including the ones that didn't work out.