» » Peindre ou faire l'amour (2005)

Peindre ou faire l'amour (2005) Online HD

Peindre ou faire lu0027amour
Peindre ou faire l'amour (2005)
Movie
  • Director:
    Arnaud Larrieu,Jean-Marie Larrieu
  • Category:
  • Writer:
    Arnaud Larrieu,Jean-Marie Larrieu
  • Cast:
    Sabine Azéma,Daniel Auteuil,Amira Casar
  • Time:
    1h 40min
  • Year:
    2005
Happily married, faithful to each other, and still very much in love, the middle-aged couple of the early-retired meteorologist, William Lasserre, and his successful businesswoman wife, Madeleine, enjoy a well-ordered life, now that their only daughter has moved to Italy. But, Madeleine is also a skilful painter--and during one of her usual walks in the alpine Vercors region--not only will she stumble upon the town's sophisticated blind mayor, Adam, but also the picturesque rural farmhouse that would become the pair's new dream home. Obviously, things couldn't be better for the Lasserres; however, when calamity strikes Adam and his charming young wife, Eva, it's only natural that the disaster-stricken neighbours would taste a slice of William and Madeleine's warm and lavish hospitality. Just until they get back on their feet..
Casts
Credited cast:
Sabine Azéma Sabine Azéma - Madeleine Lasserre
Daniel Auteuil Daniel Auteuil - William Lasserre
Amira Casar Amira Casar - Eva
Sergi López Sergi López - Adam
Hélène de Saint-Père Hélène de Saint-Père - Julie
Philippe Katerine Philippe Katerine - Mathieu
Sabine Haudepin Sabine Haudepin - Suzanne
Roger Miremont Roger Miremont - Roger
Jacques Nolot Jacques Nolot - Michel
Marie-Pierre Chaix Marie-Pierre Chaix - Annick
Florence Loiret Caille Florence Loiret Caille - Élise (as Florence Loiret-Caille)
Thiago Telès Thiago Telès - Joao
Philippe Suner Philippe Suner
Cécile Reigher Cécile Reigher
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Henri Behar-Thinières Henri Behar-Thinières

Peindre ou faire l'amour (2005)
Aver
Aver
Mardelene is a hobby painter who met Adam by chance while indulging in her pastime on a fine day in the countryside. Adam, who is visually impaired, then introduced her to a country house which was on sale and Mardelene was immediately taken away by its beauty. She convinced her husband, William, who is into meteorology and has decided on an early retirement to purchase the house. Things took an interesting turn as they met Adam's other half during a dinner at the their new place.

Set on a beautiful French countryside and in a charming rustic country house, the story revolves around two couples; the first couple's relationship was put on test as they met the second couple. The trust that was built among them transformed into a slippery slope of pleasure and guilt. A highly poetic film with excellent music and breath-taking sceneries.
Prinna
Prinna
Any film with Daniel Auteuil and Sabine Azema is, for my money, worth watching. They are two of the world's great actors, capable of reaching across the full range of the acting spectrum, from explosive emotions to farce to whimsical or dark introspection, as they do in Peindre ou faire l'amour.

Auteuil, he of that magnificent Gallic face, plays a retired meteorologist who, from force of habit perhaps, slips into regular, inane (and humorous) asides about the weather. As his beautiful wife, Azema is a talented landscape painter. They're both in their late 50s, and they decide to retire to the country and live out their golden years in idyllic examinations of wondrous nature and the philosophy of being.

Anyone living in retirement (this writer for example) knows this is a noble idea, but it rarely, if ever, works. Boredom and ennui creep in very quickly after one retires, despite the bullblip and smarmy insurance company agitprop to the contrary. Retirement means disorientation, a separation from routine and self, and the characters in Peindre, etc. demonstrate this very well.

Enter Sergei Lopez, an edgy and terrific actor who so convincingly played the violent and obsessively jealous husband in the Spanish film Sole Mia. In Peindre, etc., he is a blind man who captivates Azema through his disturbing mystique and his super-sensitivity to smell and sound. Lopez's wife is the lovely Amira Casar, and they're called Adam and Eva, not exactly a subtle choice of names by writers-directors (and brothers) Armand and Jean-Marie Larrieu. Lopez and Casar, in the non-Biblical sense, metaphorically create a new world for Auteuil and Azema.

Lopez's character is deceptive; he appears kind, caring, gentle, but beneath it there's mischief, if not malice, brewing: he 'sees' much more than the merely sighted, and he quietly manipulates both Auteuil and Azema, so much so that they begin to alter their lives because of him.

Both couples just casually fall into an adulterous relationship that is done with such minimalist matter-of-factness by the Larrieus that you really wonder if it's happening at all. The mini-'swinging' is done with an unusual lack of fuss -- you won't see the usual (and, these days, hopelessly overdone) surfeit of moaning, writhing and sweating bodies. The adulterous act, a first for Auteuil and Azema, is initially traumatic, but then becomes a galvanizing force in their new, 'retired' lives.

Questions arise: what does love really mean when partners 'switch' for sexual purposes, while still professing profound love for each other? Are they, in fact, REALLY in love? In the midst of their carnality, who are they really deceiving other than each other? Does sex really have any meaning other than self-satisfaction or self-absorption?

I liked this understated film because it skillfully handles difficult subject matter and raises very human questions. The moods of the characters and the film's premises are complemented by magnificent scenery (light, shadow and dark are regularly examined and contrasted). The aesthetic visions of both the artist and the sightless man, who cannot 'see' beauty in the literal sense, but articulates it through other heightened senses, lead you to ask once again the ageless question: what is art?

The haunting music of the late Belgian 'cafe' singer Jacques Brel is a tremendous bonus. Both he and Canada's Leonard Cohen are unmatched in expressing powerful visceral and cerebral poetry in songs that probe the eternal mystery of love and why we somehow, through the eons, have never really understood its source or its power.
Stick
Stick
This is a very good little film that starts off enigmatically (I thought I was watching something by Rohmer from his Green Ray period) and gets better and better as it goes along. Daniel Auteuil and Sabine Azéma play very well together (their first pairing; I hope there will be more) and Sergi Lopez and Amira Casar are also good as the couple who make swinging look so easy. William and Madeleine are mid-50s, their daughter is getting married in a couple of months so they are facing an empty nest with a little trepidation. Adam and Eva enter their lives and quickly establish an emotional dependency on the other couple's part. It is this dependency and not the sex that becomes decisive for William and Madeleine.

This is the first feature by the Larrieu brothers that I have seen; it is very promising. They know how to create an emotional atmosphere without camera tricks or an annoying sound track. I advise men with heart problems to skip the scene with Hélène de Saint-Père: when she takes her dress off she reveals a truly astounding body.
Daizil
Daizil
I saw this film at the 2006 Palm Springs International Film Festival and enjoyed this movie very much. This is not a big film but it has a lot going for it. It's smart, charming, has a lot of style and is quite humorous. Great outdoor scenes. Since it is a story who's principal character is an artist I expected it to go overboard with stylized cinematography and try to create every scene as a painting but it didn't do that. It gave you the flavor of her love of painting without trying to recreate it on screen. This is a refreshing movie in that it's all about middle age people and so is the audience they seek. The baby boomer audience who are in 2006 between the ages of 42 and 60 should expect to see more movies geared to their age group coming their way. The cast is great in this movie and the four central characters and two supporting characters are a fun study. Great music in this too. I would give it a 7.0 out of a possible 10 and recommend it.
Sha
Sha
This is a movie that just begs for someone to observe how FRENCH it is, the implication being that other countries somehow can't get their celluloid souffles to rise quite like the Gauls. Be that as it may this IS, I suppose, typically French, whatever that means. Sabine Azema and Daniel Auteuil are a well-heeled couple of the 'early retirement' school. Azema likes to dabble in landscapes and whilst she is thus occupied a blind man (Sergi Lopez) tells her and shows - if that is the right word - her a house that is for sale. In nothing flat she and Auteuil are installed and beginning a new life in which Lopez and his wife (Amira Casar) quickly become their new best friends and in the fullness of time - probably about two or three months - it's wife-swapping time. Azema and Auteuil take to this like ducks to water so much so that they're soon advertising for like-minded couples. If it sounds sordid on the page it doesn't come across like that on the screen, possibly because it's French. All the principals are on top of their game and Casar proves that there IS life after Catherine Breillat. Well worth a look.
Laitchai
Laitchai
I watched this movie accidentally and I wish I had saved my Euros. You see very good-looking people, enjoying their lives fully, stereotypically named (Adam & Eva), a newly remodeled house that looks like it had been in use for months at least... The problems in this movie are no real problems, everything is easy and at the end we choose between some paradisiacal island and an idyllic home. This movie looked like one of those 'Better living at home' magazines to me. Everything is sooo very pleasant and tasteful.

Daniel Auteuil seems to be the only one who realizes he is totally out of place, but he can't find a way out from the set. Don't watch this, unless you need some ideas for how to decorate your home or where to go for vacation.
Vivados
Vivados
I went to see it unexpectedly yesterday evening. It's absolutely amazing. For all of us 30, 40, 50 somethings out there, it's a real breath of fresh air. Sabine Azema never looked so stunning (to say the least!). The appearance of Philippe Katerine at the end as well as scores from Jacques Brel (an incredible echo at the moment when they play "Les Marquises" made me cry straight away). Even Daniel Auteuil whom I really don't like most of the time plays well here, as well as all the other actors. I would advise all of you to go and see it if you'd like to follow Borges' advice :"wash your eyes between each looks". It's what this movie will allow you to do, no more, no less.
Mbon
Mbon
"Peindre ou faire l'amour" is a film light like a feather. There is nothing dark about it. It is a film about spontaneity, a film about getting back enjoyment in life through art and sex, through friendship and sex, and through sex. Almost all characters in the film are blessed with a constant level of sexual desires, which results of their carelessness. Our main characters for example (played by Daniel Auteuil and Sabine Azéma): The husband has just retired and has a lot of time and his wife's nature seems to be very sexual in general. Or their new friends (played by Sergi Lopez and Amira Casar): It looks like it has always been their plan to get to bed with Auteuil's and Azéma's character. Or at least to gather different sexual experiences. Moreover, nearly all characters, who appear in this film come twosome, as a couple (which says a lot about the world it plays in). All in all a light and very good film, funny at times, touching at times, and for the characters always interesting.
Manesenci
Manesenci
There are films one loves to hate. This one is so awful, so contrived, so inane, so pretentious, so ludicrous at times ( particularly the dialogue ) that I wonder how well-known actors like Azema and Auteuil condescended to be part of such an abysmal opus. That it was well-received in France and Belgium is a sad reflection on some people's critical faculties, and also on the topics that we deem worthy of attention ( or rather on our treatment of them ). I understand that the directors, the Larrieu brothers, until their disastrous foray into serious film-making, had made documentaries about insects, quite a worthy enterprise ( one has only to think of the superb BBC productions ). Perhaps their intimacy with these tiny creatures have deprived them of any savoir-faire when dealing with human beings and their problems, since their stilted direction and clumsy camera work make the spectator wonder:" am I missing something? Is there some hidden intention in such lack of talent ?" I am relieved to note that there is a reviewer in Germany who shares my opinion that this film is unadulterated faeces.
Shezokha
Shezokha
As long as you don't take this film seriously it is charming to engage in the sensuousness of the setting and the encouragement for new adventures in the autumn of ones years.