Poldark Online HD

Poldark
Poldark
TV Series
British officer Ross Poldark returns to his native Cornwall after the Revolutionary War after escaping as a prisoner of war. He finds that because he was believed dead, his home has fallen into ruin and his estate has shifted to his mercenary uncle following the death of his father. His uncle has committed to selling the family copper and tin mines to a ruthless local land baron while his former fiancée has agreed to marry his cousin in his absence.
Casts
Series cast summary:
Robin Ellis Robin Ellis - Ross Poldark 29 episodes, 1975-1977
Angharad Rees Angharad Rees - Demelza 28 episodes, 1975-1977
Jill Townsend Jill Townsend - Elizabeth Warleggan / - 27 episodes, 1975-1977
Ralph Bates Ralph Bates - George Warleggan 23 episodes, 1975-1977
Paul Curran Paul Curran - Jud Paynter 22 episodes, 1975-1977
Mary Wimbush Mary Wimbush - Prudie Paynter 22 episodes, 1975-1977
Judy Geeson Judy Geeson - Caroline Penvenen / - 19 episodes, 1975-1977
Forbes Collins Forbes Collins - Zacky Martin 14 episodes, 1975-1977
Clive Francis Clive Francis - Francis Poldark 13 episodes, 1975
Kevin McNally Kevin McNally - Drake Carne 13 episodes, 1977
David Delve David Delve - Sam Carne 12 episodes, 1977

Poldark

The role of Ross Poldark was originally offered to Ian McShane; Leigh Lawson and Timothy Dalton were also considered before Robin Ellis was cast in the role.

The series attracted up to 15 million viewers.

Robin Ellis and Angharad Rees were lined up to reprise their characters in the attempt to reboot Poldark (1996), but producers HTV reneged on their promises and recast the parts, much to the disappointment of long-term fans who actually staged a physical protest against the decision.

In his introduction to the series' American premiere on PBS Masterpiece Theatre, Alistair Cooke informed the viewing audience that "now is the time for the party to settle in to a spate of loving, dueling, poaching, smuggling, wenching, marrying - not to mention banking and copper mining." Cooke has stated that "Poldark" was his least favorite Masterpiece Theatre program, possibly because he also said that the hero, Ross Poldark, reminded him of President Ronald Reagan.

Many of the cast found themselves puzzling over their characters' plot lines, only to discover what they felt was "right" in Winston Graham's original novels, seemingly ignored by the scriptwriters. Richard Morant elected to leave after the first series as a result, and his part was rewritten and recast with Michael Cadman. This was wryly reflected on-screen in the line: "I'm not the same man who went away."

Scriptwriter Martin Worth was dispatched by the BBC to contact Winston Graham once his published plots had been exhausted, in order to brainstorm new ones. Graham (who had already argued with the production team) refused, and so the series was abruptly brought to an end. Graham later continued the story in books.

Studio scenes were rehearsed for six days before being recorded over two days in the studio between 19:30 and 22:00 in the evening.

Michael Gambon was offered a role.

Elizabeth's full name is Elizabeth Jane Sarah Chynoweth (stated at her wedding to Francis Poldark).

Jazu
Jazu
I first saw this in the '70's when I was about to enter my teens, it made such an impact on me that every time it was re-screened I was glued and made sure I got it on DVD when it was released. Set in 18th Century Cornwall it tells the story of the trials and tribulations of people who you deeply care about, which is part of it's real success. I lived in that part of the world for 14 years and the beauty of the area is shown perfectly and the atmosphere of the times is spot on, it is not glamourised at all. All the performances are excellent without exception and it is a complete joy to watch again and again. A must see. I quite simply love it.
Cargahibe
Cargahibe
OK, so Ross originally fought AGAINST us in our Revolution, but he is one of us at heart. A fellow with an appropriate sense of noblesse oblige, even if he ignores his own safety and interests in carrying it out, is so irresistible. How could Elizabeth have been so foolish as to not appreciate that essential element of his character?

Robin Ellis' performance is so amazingly positive we can't help but feel that anyone who finds themselves on a downward spiral can get it together if they have enough courage and determination. He's a role model for anyone who's even tempted to throw in the towel.

And a big Bronx cheer to the late Louis B. Mayer for denigrating things "where people write with feathers." The period of this story is one of my all-time favorites and not just for the clothes (I challenge anyone to say that the men of this series look anything but appropriately masculine), but for the ideals that were born in it. Sometimes we need to go back to our roots...
greatest
greatest
I have been watching this series since I was a child and absolutely love it. The actors are wonderful and the drama keeps going. You really learn to love these people, or hate them as the case may be. Some drama is not appropriate for children. I rent it from my local library once a year. My husband can even stand this one. There is a lot of character development as the people mature and they diverge through several different groups and couples. You get to see love develop and change through many different relationships. I only wish they would hurry up and provide this series on DVD, one and two. You need to watch the whole series, right now it is 12 episodes of 2 hours each. I have been requesting it for years now. A definite worth the time.
GoodBuyMyFriends
GoodBuyMyFriends
Poldark originally was broadcast here in the US on Masterpiece Theater. While many Masterpiece Theater Shows have been excellent, Poldark stood out as probably the best of any I have ever seen. It was amazing. A story about a man just returning from the revolutionary war to find his home and estate in ruins, the girl he loved gone and many challenges to face. Well acted and well directed this story will keep you guessing and wanting more. I can't recommend this one enough. I hope they put it on DVD soon so I can see it again and again.

Note: There is also another Poldark series, Poldark II, which is a continuation of this series and tells you the rest of the story.
Malodred
Malodred
I remember my mum being glued to BBC's Poldark when I was little (eight years old to be exact!) so when the first series was shown again in the eighties I watched and was hooked. I bought the videos as they were released and rationed myself to an hour a night! I have watched and enjoyed both series many times since.

The BBC got everything right, it's a rip roaring tale with a wonderful cast, well worth a look if you haven't seen it or if you haven't seen it for a while!

Why couldn't ITV have employed Robin Ellis and Angharad Rees when they made that Poldark 'special' a few years ago.
Datrim
Datrim
If you read the books first or see the series first, either is a very satisfying experience. Lovers of romantic period novels should give this series a try. If I remember correctly, the first series covers the first 3 books; the second, books 4, 5, and 6 (the titles escape me). Graham wrote more books after the first six but those have never been dramatized for movie or television. Look this up on Amazon for more user comments.
Mr.Twister
Mr.Twister
This series is a welcome dramatization of the Winston Graham novels dealing with the Poldarks of Cornwall. The acting is great and the local scenery enthralling. The programs are full of adventure, intrigue, romance and also provide an interesting insight into the lives of miners at the end of the 18th century.
Wnex
Wnex
When this "mini-series" first aired in the U.S. I was in junior high school and waited eagerly for each weekly episode to air on our local PBS station. Now, as an adult, I still find it completely engrossing and entertaining, only now on my DVD whenever I desire.

"The Poldark Saga" captures the struggles of an 18th century Cornish family, both economic and social, with characters that one can grow to love and cherish. This was a ground-breaking series in the 70's, taking the action off of the sound stage, and on to location. As the series progresses, the outdoor scenes improve, adding the rugged beauty of Cornwall to the cast of characters. This is a lovely series, and highly recommended for anyone who loves a costume drama that is truly British.
BlackBerry
BlackBerry
What a series! My husband and I were spellbound for the 18 or so hours (over a month) it took to watch Part 1 and 2. The plot twists are great but what is primarily so entrancing is the presentation of life at the end of the 18th Century. We particularly like Ross Poldark's propensity for going into prisons and removing prisoners who have been falsely jailed or whom he is fond of. He does this on a fairly regular basis. Cornwall seems to be very much like Seattle - only a few scenes are shot in sunshine - all in all, a sort of up-scale, historical soap-opera.
Ffel
Ffel
Don't get me wrong, as explained in my review for the recent 'Poldark' series, the recent adaptation of 'Poldark' which first aired last year is a great and often magnificent series that was one of 2015 television's highlights in a year where my television watching was pretty sporadic.

Just that this 1975 adaptation is even better. Whereas the newer version had minor flaws with occasional pacing issues and Jud being played too straight (for my liking that is), this one was perfectly paced and the performance of Jud brought much needed levity and beautifully timed humour to the proceedings. Didn't have any problem with this version, didn't detect any scenery chewing (something that's obvious to me) and the 70s production values still looked good and added to 'Poldark's' charm.

Even if the production values are of its time and the newer version has more clarity and polish, the series still looks great. It's beautifully photographed, evocatively costumed to the extent that it's like being transported back in time to that period, has very faithful attention to detail (even more so than the recent version) and has splendid scenery that doesn't look confined or studio-bound.

'Poldark' is understatedly scored, intelligently written, richly characterised and dramatically compelling with plenty of tense and poignant moments handsomely staged. Robin Ellis and particularly Angharad Rees are excellent in the lead roles, while Jill Townsend and Paul Curran are notably sterling support.

In summary, wonderful and the superior version. Both versions are highly recommended. Will watch the 1996 version, but am not expecting much. 10/10 Bethany Cox
Bajinn
Bajinn
Ross Poldark returns to Cornwall from fighting against the Americans in the Revolutionary War to find his father dead, economic conditions bad, the Wheal Leisure mine nearly exhausted, the family's residence in a ruinous condition, and his true love Elizabeth, who had thought him dead, engaged to his cousin, Francis. And this triangle becomes a quadrangle, because Elizabeth is also the object of banker George Warleggan's affections. Tension between Poldark and the Warleggan family also arises from the fact that the Warleggans, although descendants of illiterate blacksmiths, often employ their considerable financial power against Poldark. Francis' sister Verity appears destined to become an old maid. And Ross's servants, Jud and Prudie, have been raising chickens in the living room and sampling libations from the family wine cellar. After rescuing what he believes is a young lad who is being beaten by an angry merchant, Ross discovers that the "lad" is actually a destitute teenage girl, Demelza. Thus, as there are three men in Elizabeth's life, there are two women in Ross's life.

The Poldark saga is based on the novels of Winston Graham. Graham spent many years in Cornwall and was evidently fascinated by its history. From 1945 to 2002, he published 12 novels about the adventures of the Poldark family from 1783 to 1820. Graham conducted extensive research in Cornish history. And his books reflect his knowledge of mining, and local customs, notably the tradition of collective action in smuggling, rioting (the riot in episode 5 may have been inspired by an actual riot in Truro over corn prices), dealing with ship wrecks, and punishing informers. In general, Graham's sympathies are with the common people, although he finds worthy and unworthy persons in all classes.

Several Poldark novels were brought to the screen in the 1970s—the first four volumes (1783 -1793) in Series I, and volumes 5 – 7 (1794 – 1799) in Series II. Two decades later, an attempt was made to film the events in volume 8 (1810-1811), but this effort met a somewhat unfavorable reception—those who had not seen Series I and II did not know the history of the Poldarks, and those who had seen the previous Series did not accept the changes in the cast. A new Poldark series is currently being telecast in the U.S. by PBS.

The 1970s version was filmed in location in Cornwall. In it we see filthy miners in dimly lit mines, and the gentry socializing and dancing in collars, frilly cuffs and powdered wigs. The domestic scenes were filmed in Cornish houses and farms; the mine scenes in the Levant Mine, with filming guided by advice from the Camborne School of Mines.

The casting in Series I and II was extremely effective. As Ross Poldark, Robin Ellis captures the hero's courage, loyalties, strong emotions, impulsiveness, and occasional willingness to break the law. He is more comfortable around the common people than around the gentry; and he informs an Anglican clergyman that North American Indians are "often more Christian than we." Angharad Rees was an excellent choice for the role of Demelza, who gradually transforms herself from an unwashed, uneducated, and undisciplined pickpocket into a lady. But Demelza (who may be based on Graham's real life wife) is never entirely accepted by society—and her loyalties are to her people, who are "poor, ignorant and rough, but at least they're honest." Jill Townsend, with an improbable resume that includes a number of American television westerns, is effective as Elizabeth. Even the minor characters, such as the dissolute neighbor Sir Hugh Bodrugan, the loquacious banker Pascoe, and the absent-minded solicitor Pearce, have distinctive personalities. Especially noteworthy is Paul Curran, whose portrayal of Jud—fond of liquor but averse to work, missing various teeth, but never lacking explanations for delaying tasks, or assigning them to someone else—brings a touch of levity to many scenes.

The newest version of Poldark features more imaginative filming techniques, especially panoramic shots and views of figures walking or riding along the horizon. But its casting is more conventional, and the differences between the characters are less pronounced. In particular, Eleanor Tomlinson is less credible as Demelza—a motherless waif who has been sleeping rough and stealing food to stay alive—than Angharad Rees. And Philip Davis' performance as Jud lacks the antic humor that Paul Curran brought to this role in the earlier version. But Heida Reed, as Elizabeth, bears a strong resemblance to Jill Townsend. Casting is a matter of personal preference—if you believe that some performances by members of the 1970s Poldark cast were "over the top," you may be happier with the performances of the current cast.

If you are ever in Mineral Point, Wisconsin, you can visit the Pendarvis Historic Site to see how Cornish miners lived, and patronize local restaurants to sample pasties and figgyhobbin.
Malann
Malann
Romance, drama, Cornish history including the mining, the smugglers, shipwrecks, it has it all! I own the whole series, Poldark and Poldark 2. Just finished going through them both for the second time on video plus saw the originals on TV in the seventies. Hopefully they will appear on DVD soon.

The IMDb page seemingly lists all the characters/actors, even the bit players with little or no speaking parts. Something puzzles me here: One of the more important characters was a Dr. Behenna, played by Hugh Dickson. The character appears prominently in most, if not all, episodes and his part is essential to the plot. Strangely, this character is not even mentioned by IMDb - or by Amazon. Even more strange is that a look at the IMDb page for Hugh Dickson makes no mention of his part in Poldark or Poldark 2. Anybody have an explanation?
Roru
Roru
I had not heard of this BBC series until recent years, and I wasn't familiar with British author Winston Graham or his many novels that were the basis for "Poldark." But having enjoyed a number of British dramatic series ("The Barchester Chronicles," "Smiley's People," "Enemy at the Door," "Wish Me Luck"), I bought the DVD set. As with all the others, this one didn't disappoint. I don't think it can be rated with the best of British TV-cinema ("Brideshead Revisited," "Upstairs Downstairs," "Reilly: Ace of Spies"), but it is another very entertaining series. At times mysterious, at times griping, at times romantic, at times sad, "Poldark" presents a picture of life on the Cornwall Coast of England around the turn of the 19th century.

About half way through the first season films, I found that I was getting involved in the story to the point of chiding a character or being dismayed at what one or another was doing or going to do. I realized then, that a series such as this had much more appeal and ability to draw me into the story and lives of the characters than would a normal movie of two hours or less. And that meant that I could see foibles and follies and similarities with the things I may have done or the way I may have acted or lived at times in the past. And, with the DVD set, I didn't have to wait one week or more between segments. I think that the more involved one becomes in a story, such as this series, the more one can identify with characters and even past experiences. And that makes the film series that much more meaningful and enjoyable.

The main story thread is well known and discussed. But the series contains many sub-plots, and even smaller plots within those. It has danger, action, adventure, and thrills. It has romance, humor, death, sorrow and despair. In its course, it touches on or exposes virtually every major vice and virtue. And it explores the cardinal vices to the hilt – greed and pride. Absent any preachiness in the script itself, "Poldark" does a masterful job of showing the age-old truths of life that used to be taught to children in the homes and schools. Charity, kindness, forgiveness, sharing, helping and goodness lead to happiness. Greed, pride, anger, selfishness, lust and revenge lead to emptiness, sorrow and despair.

No one person remains spotless in character, though Demelza is the closest to a living saint. Ross Poldark is a kind-hearted and good- natured person, but his pride leads him to make bad judgments; and his lust for his cousin's wife (and former sweetheart) hurts him for a time, and blinds him to the unconditional love and devotion of his wife. The greed of the Warleggen's is the most obvious of their vices, and their subsequent chicanery, dishonesty and vengeful actions just deepen their morass. They lose all integrity, civility and any sense of peace and happiness. So many other actors have wonderful parts in this series and add to the diversity of characters and experiences. The acting is superb all around.

Some people have likened this series to daytime soap operas. It surely has the complexity of plots and subplots characteristic of the soaps. But "Poldark" has more than that. It has depth of the characters. It has a setting and overall theme that celebrate a culture and region of England. And it takes place during an interesting time in history that hasn't been explored a lot in films of the past. It's a most interesting and intriguing story and series. As a side note, the two-season series was based only on the first six or seven novels Graham wrote about Poldark. Apparently, the author and producers weren't able to agree on a further season or more to complete the stories of the novels. I think that's OK, because the ending is just fine as it is. I agree with others who have said "Poldark" isn't dated in its theme. Indeed, is it not evident all around us today?
Forey
Forey
I think that this drama series is so amazing, so captivating, with great acting and performance, from Captain Ross Poldark & Demelza to Jed Paynter.

I was so hooked watching the first part, that I had to rush to the closest library and get Poldark 2.

I am currently watching part5 and can't help wishing there was a Poldark 3...If the BBC ever makes one, I'll be the first to watch it!

And I agree with an earlier comment that the BBC always manages to put out fantastic drama and great screen adaptations to great novels.

Thanks to the BBC for giving us something so amazing to watch!!
Legionstatic
Legionstatic
Brilliant story lines with excellent sub plots, fantastic characters, sublime acting.

Possibly my all time favourite which prompted me to read all the Poldark novels by Whinston Graham. Reading books after I have seen the dramatisation is not something I usually do.
Kerdana
Kerdana
I did like this series when it first aired. I never understand why no one ever mentions Jill Townsend. I remember liking her very much when she was in the western series Cimarron Strip. She played a young girl named Dulcey (early lust). I later enjoyed the actress who played Elizabeth in the Poldark series. It wasn't until later that I realized that it was Duclie matured. Jill appeared in a few movies, TV spots and then nothing. Her last movie was the Awakening. I remember enjoying seeing her in that movie. No, she seems to have disappeared off the media's radar screen. Anyway, here is a 10 vote for Jill Townsend. I wish she would return to the screen.
Winotterin
Winotterin
I'm a big fan of exactly this kind of movie/series: period setting, based on a literary work, and complex, involving characters.

I've heard of "Poldark" my whole life, and because both the description and the reviews here made it sound like a slam-dunk for me.

It was good enough that I watched all the episodes. But oh, my - how in the world does this rate as one of the best dramatic series to come out of England? It is nowhere near that, and for very concrete reasons.

The caliber of acting is all over the map. The primary leads are very strong; some secondary characters are well-handled, others performed at community-theatre level. And the bit parts - oh, my god. Almost painfully bad in a lot of cases. Scenery chewing,overly-affected clichéd personas - I actually burst out laughing more than once.

Even some who are very good reveal their weaknesses over the long run, as the performances (and the episodic plots) become more predictable, more repetitious. I started hearing the bots from MST3k in my head, mocking both script and actors. (Never a good sign.) Adult characters, never age. Kids get older and bigger, from cooing in their crib to middle-school age, while their elders go on looking exactly the same. Not even a wave in the direction of smile lines or a sneaky streak of grey hair. Perfect for all eternity.

The oldest character, on the other hand, is comically over-made up with thick, vaudeville-style aging, including lines drawn so clearly and boldly over her entire face it would read to the back of the fourth balcony. Great for stage; not so much with movie closeups. She looked like a Halloween partier.

When one character dies a sudden shocking death, arguably a homicide - the topic is dropped. This character has a three or four episode run, is well established, and more likable than many. Who will discover the death? What will become of the miscreant whose hand she died by? Will he get away with it? Will her relatives probe this at all, or accept it as a natural death? NOTHING happens. She's dead upstairs, and her departure is never noted. An episode or two later her grave is mentioned, which is our first indication she's not rotting undiscovered in the attic.

Eventually, mean people being mean just because they're mean, and good people being valiant and good because that's what they are, wears really thin. With one amazing getaway after another, lucky breaks and timely interruptions at a Monty Python-esque rate, and a cliffhanger at the end of almost every episode, what began as a great tale well told turns into a beautifully-dressed, implausible soap opera.

That "Poldark" was made in the 70s doesn't account for any of the above. Good story-telling is ageless; continuity should be a given; screen makeup has been an established art for decades.

One final note about accents and subtitles: almost every American will appreciate subtitles for this. One character in particular affects a thick, nearly unintelligible accent. But beware Netflix! The caption quality varies. In one episode, nearly every place name is displayed as "(inaudible)". One character's name changes twice in the subtitles in one short scene! And too many subtitles are just wrong. You'll get by, but you'll be distracted and perhaps irritated.

But hey - if you've got laundry to fold and want some company, this will do the job.