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White Lightning
White Lightning (1973)
Movie
  • Director:
    Joseph Sargent
  • Category:
  • Writer:
    William W. Norton
  • Cast:
    Burt Reynolds,Jennifer Billingsley,Ned Beatty
  • Time:
    1h 41min
  • Year:
    1973
An ex con teams up with federal agents to help them with breaking up a moonshine ring.
Casts
Cast overview, first billed only:
Burt Reynolds Burt Reynolds - Bobby 'Gator' McKlusky
Jennifer Billingsley Jennifer Billingsley - Lou
Ned Beatty Ned Beatty - Sheriff J.C. Connors
Bo Hopkins Bo Hopkins - Roy Boone
Matt Clark Matt Clark - Dude Watson
Louise Latham Louise Latham - Martha Culpepper
Diane Ladd Diane Ladd - Maggie (as Diane Lad)
R.G. Armstrong R.G. Armstrong - Big Bear
Conlan Carter Conlan Carter - Deputy
Dabbs Greer Dabbs Greer - Pa McKlusky
Lincoln Demyan Lincoln Demyan - Warden
John Steadman John Steadman - Skeeter
Iris Korn Iris Korn - Ma McKlusky
Stephanie Burchfield Stephanie Burchfield - Jenny
Barbara Muller Barbara Muller - Louella

White Lightning (1973)

Selected by Quentin Tarantino for the First Quentin Tarantino Film Fest in Austin, Texas, 1996.

This was originally slated to be Steven Spielberg's first theatrical feature and he spent months on pre-production.

This was the first of the car stunt movies set in the American South that Burt Reynolds made during the 1970s and involved some kind of battle with a sheriff or official. This group of movies includes the Smokey and the Bandit films and this movie's sequel, Gator (1976).

Some of composer Charles Bernstein's music score from this movie was re-used in two Quentin Tarantino movies: Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003) and Vääritud tõprad (2009).

This movie used the town of Benton, Arkansas as Bogan county.

The I-30 speedway was used at the Benton speedway. This speedway is actually just over in Pulaski county (little rock, Arkansas) from Saline county where Benton is actually located.

The meaning and relevance of this movie's title White Lightning (1973) is that it is a slang colloquial expression for moonshine whiskey. Moonshine is the MacGuffin subject of this movie.

Les Claypool, the lead singer/bassist for the band Primus, references Burt Reynolds on the song Camelback Cinema from Primus' Brown Album, with the line. He likes Burt in White Lightning.

According to Culture Vulture, this movie was "the earliest in the cycle of hick flicks that Burt Reynolds rode to superstardom" on.

A sequel to this movie Gator (1976) named after the first name of Burt Reynolds's Gator McKlusky character in this movie was released about three years after this picture came out.

This movie's original title was 'McKlusky' which is the surname of the main character, Gator McKlusky, played by Burt Reynolds. Interestingly, the sequel to this movie was named after this character's first name, Gator (1976).

Laura Dern: This movie was Dern's uncredited film debut. Dern was just six years old in this brief non-speaking walk on bit part. Dern plays the daughter of her real life mother Diane Ladd who appears in this movie as Maggie.

The chase sequence that ends with Gator's car sailing from a river bank onto a barge went seriously wrong. The plan was for the car (driven by stuntman Hal Needham) to land squarely on the mound of soft earth in the barge, on the take he fell short and landed on the rear of the barge with the rear of the car hanging into the water. Needham was hurt and stunned, Reynolds watching the scene from behind the camera dove into the water, swam to the barge and helped pull Needham out of the car. Needham recovered from his injuries.

Gator's car is a 1971 Ford LTD Galaxie 500 with 429 4-speed and rigged for speed. It was one of 2 he drove, the other was an automatic. It was also offered by Ford from the factory as such.

Livina
Livina
As a 15 year old I watched parts of this movie being made. It was partly filmed in Benton Arkansas (30 miles S of LR). Benton was also the location for Sling Blade. My mom's Volkswagen and my bicycle show up in this movie.

It really is a somewhat accurate view of the South in the 70's from the rejection of hippies by "Good ole boys" to the Corrupt Sheriff, to the home for unwed mothers to the interaction of the races while still staying "respectfully apart". The movie was not intended to be an Oscar contender it was intended to capitalize on Reynolds immense popularity at the time. It did this well. Ned Beaty shaved his head to give himself the proper receding hairline for a Southern sheriff, and many locals were cast. If you like car chases, and "good ole boys" you'll love this. Otherwise you can watch it for it's historical value as a peek at the South through Hollywood colored eyes.

In an interview with Larry King, Ned Beaty said this was the most important role of his career because it kept him from being typecast as a wimp after Deliverance. Diane Ladd and her daughter, Laura Dern are both in this film.
Kelezel
Kelezel
Gator McKlusky who's serving time in an Arkansas prison, finds out his younger brother is murdered by the corrupt town Sheriff J.C Connors. Wanting revenge, he agrees with the terms of going undercover as a moonshine runner for the feds and informing them of any important information to put away Connors. However it's Gator's personal quest of his brother's death, which pushes him to test the boundaries and power that Connors owns.

Quite likable, and truly a thick southern slice of crudely good ol' fun and rousing mishaps. Burt Reynolds' charismatic appeal was specially made for the part, and along side him is a terrifically well-served cast including the despicable Ned Betty, glorious Jennifer Billingsley, amusing Bo Hopkins, twitchy Matt Clark, live wire Diane Ladd and a rigid R.G Armstrong. Splendid line-up, but Reynolds was the real scene-stealer. The story might be a simple revenge tale with some currents involving racism and narrow-mindlessness, but it's a exhilarating pot boiler that's neatly drawn up with plenty of flesh hanging off it, and its zips onto one scene after another with burning conviction. Look out for an enjoyable reference to Don Siegel/Clint Eastwood's southern thriller "The Beguiled (1971)". The authenticity of the sweaty southern setting is beautifully captured with Edward Rosson's sharp photography doing the trick. Be it during the quiet moments, or the well-engineered, gut-busting brawls and blistering car chases. Even Charles Bernstein's wonderfully flavoured and titillating music arrangement dominates and goes a long way to cementing the film's potent personality. Director Joseph Sargent rapidly, rough n' tumble style, goes down well the tautly wry script and delivers the action with the right intensity. Amongst the tough suspense and sweet fooling, there are some genuinely moving scenes.

Always compelling, and one of Reynolds best performances.
TheSuspect
TheSuspect
They certainly don't make movies like this anymore. Likable characters, good story, a very charismatic Burt Reynolds. As for the action, I would take well-filmed, exciting car chase and action sequences as seen in White Lightning over CGI special effects in today's films any day! Rural locations in the South are also used to great effect. You can almost feel the cold water of the swamp in a great opening sequence, the ears of corn bouncing off the windshield as Reynolds drives the souped-up Ford through a cornfield, and the dust coming off the tires. As also observed by movie critic Roger Ebert, today's special effects- laden movies have forgotten how to make the location of the story, the land, a character in itself. After seeing this film at a drive-in theater around 1975, White Lighting was a "bad influence" on a kid as I was in rural Wisconsin who had just gotten his driving license. I would discreetly take the parent's car and my friends out on dusty, dirt roads in the countryside to execute "some Burt Reynolds style" driving. In addition, some parts of the movie are even touching. These include when Reynolds meets his parents for the first time after spending time in prison. And when Reynolds prior to the big chase sequence at the end proclaims his confusion to a young woman at the "Home For Young Mothers" as to why his brother who tried to make something of himself was murdered while he "had not done a damn good thing" his entire life. Enough of my ramblings. In summary, a movie with a number of added dimensions to put it far above and beyond a standard action movie. A pure classic.
Fast Lovebird
Fast Lovebird
In direct contrast to the previous review, I find this movie a well thought-out vehicle for Reynolds. Maybe some folks don't understand the 'shine business. Being an informer, turning in people who are just like you (and your family) creates great conflict within the character. Reynolds pulls it off well, even with the romantic distraction of Jennifer Billingsley, with Bo Hopkins doing his good ol' boy thing, then there's Ned Beatty.....and aww heck....you know why you watch it! It's a non-stop, pedal-to-the-metal, V8 blasting car movie! Check out those stunts...jumping a '72 Ford SeeDan (as we say here in the South) from a dock to a moving barge...great! Those full-size Mercury and Fords gobbling up the road, either chasing good ol' Gator or with him in one outrunning the cops...I mean, how much better can you get than that???

Ok, ok, I'll get serious again. It's a great action movie, regardless of whether you watch it with your coon hound or some Okie. It's got a very good plot, great action, and a good resolution......

Don't let folks kid you, Burt did good in this one!
Pedar
Pedar
Some people renting this expecting "Gator" style silliness are probably in for a surprise. This movie had a lot more of a "Deliverence" feeling than I expected, and felt authentic to the South of the 1970s. Ok, I wasn't there at the time, so it could be completely wrong. But it was convincing.

This is what Reynolds could have been--a middleweight serious Southern Action actor, like a cornpone Marlon Brando. There's just enough meat on the script to get the old mental wheels turning, and just enough action that it doesn't turn into one of those boring intellectual films about the Bad Ol' South. All in all, a good, interesting, tight movie.

Of course, it unfortunately led to "Gator" -- a bloated mess -- a few years later. Watching them back to back, it's pathetic to watch how Reynolds declined into a buffoon. As he showed in Boogie Nights, he's quite capable of playing serious dramatic roles. Too bad he didn't follow through on the promise of White Lightning, but I'm sure the $$$ were better for the garbage films he later made.
Neol
Neol
I have loved WHITE LIGHTNING ever since I was a kid and I'm glad I now own the DVD. This was before Burt got his moustache and before he started doing comical pictures. Here Burt proves he can handle the serious stuff as the story of this movie is very serious. Burt plays Gator McKlusky, an ex-con out to avenge the death of his kid brother at the hands of uber-crooked sheriff Ned Beatty. Beatty makes a truly hateful bad guy as he strives to keep his jurisdiction of Bogen County, Arkansas, the way he likes it ie: with him as the absolute ruler.

Reynolds agrees to help some federal agents prove that Beatty is taki9ng money from moonshiners but finds himself in a difficult moral position as it may mean betraying friends of his family. Ultimately, there are a lot of cool car chases and nail-biting drama as we head towards the final clash between Reynolds and Beatty. There is great support from Jennifer Billingsley, Bo Hopkins, R.G. Armstrong and Matt Clark, and the stunts (arranged by Hal Needham who would later direct Burt in SMOKEY AND THE BANDIT and CANNONBALL RUN) are excellent. This film is a must-see
Cashoutmaster
Cashoutmaster
Burt Reynolds plays "Gator" McKlusky, a good ol' boy convict who gets word that his younger brother Donny has died. Not only did Donny die, but he was deliberately drowned by a crooked sheriff, J.C. Connors (Ned Beatty). "Gator" decides to cooperate with the Feds in order to get himself out of jail so he can seek revenge. His official mission will be to get the goods on not just Connors, but the moonshiners with whom he does business.

In general, "White Lightning" is no great shakes, but it's certainly a pleasant and watchable enough rural action flick. If it does one thing well, it's that it showcases the charms of its star in fine fashion. Burt is engaging, and the strong supporting cast is a big asset. Beatty actually underplays the role of the antagonist, never turning him into the kind of cartoon character we might otherwise see in movies of this type. Jennifer Billingsley adds substantial sex appeal as Lou, the gal who turns Gators' head. First rate character actors and actresses such as Bo Hopkins, Matt Clark, Louise Latham, Diane Ladd, R.G. Armstrong, Dabbs Greer, John Steadman, and Iris Korn all contribute heavily. Buffs should note that Ladds' daughter Laura Dern appears in a couple of shots; it was her film debut.

The flavourful score by Charles Bernstein is most enjoyable, and the filmmakers get great use out of various Arkansas locations. Joseph Sargent ("Colossus: The Forbin Project", "The Taking of Pelham One Two Three") does a fine job with the first unit direction, but it's really Hal Needhams' deft handling of the action sequences that bring "White Lightning" to life at just the right times. William W. Norton wrote the screenplay, creating a convincing milieu where traditional Southerners mistrust the current young generation of hippies and protesters. There are some poignant interludes with Gator & Lou, and at a home for unwed mothers.

Fine entertainment for devotees of old drive-in movies.

Seven out of 10.
Unnis
Unnis
Although Burt Reynolds may have been more compelling in "Deliverance" (1972), he does give a fine performance in "White Lightning", as Gator McKlusky, a Southern good-ole-boy, out of prison to revenge his hippie brother's murder. And that revenge plot must, of necessity, track to Bogan County Sheriff J.C. Connors (Ned Beatty), who is involved with hillbilly whiskey stills.

Nobody could have been more convincing as a paunchy Southern redneck sheriff than Ned Beatty. Reynolds and Beatty would team up in later years to make at least two more films with a similar tone: "W.W. And The Dixie Dancekings" (1975), and "Stroker Ace" (1983). In "White Lightning", wonderful Louise Latham makes a semi-cameo appearance as Sheriff Connors' reliable secretary.

Aside from casting and acting, "White Lightning" has other things going for it, not the least of which is a realistic portrayal of a small Southern town. The authenticity, with its various bubbas who frequent the pool halls, display their guns with pride, and race cars at the local fairgrounds, is striking. And with their big engines, the film's muscle cars gleefully tear up the pavement with their screeching tires and agile corner turning.

Indeed, those cars are so souped-up they even burn rubber on dirt roads. Oh well, who cares if there's a minor sound effects plot hole. A more substantive plot hole has Sheriff Connors unfamiliar with the geography of his own county. In particular, he might want to check the map again to note the existence of a large lake at the end of one particular dirt road. Still, his ignorance is our gain as a plot point that proves symmetrically effective.

Plot holes aside, this is a film of dust, dirt, car chases, whiskey stills, the sounds of screeching tires, and some dang good performances. "White Lightning" is worth viewing also for its 1970s nostalgia, and for its authentic Southern setting.
Ferri - My name
Ferri - My name
I disagree with "helpless_dancer", from brokeback...um I mean Brokenbow, Oklahoma. I recently saw this movie after many years of not having seen a Burt Reynolds film.

I'm quite certain my IQ is above that of a "coon dog", although maybe not as high someone from Oklahoma...yeee haaa...

True- the STORY doesn't seek to explore some deep philosophical issue or impart profound wisdom to the viewer. It's not complicated, nor does it have twist & turns, and complex relationships filled with intrigue, mystery, and profound statements about the universe. No. Its enough story to carry the film's intent, which I believe is character & locale driven.

Its a visual presentation that develops the "richness" of the locale... The texture,if you will. The humanness of the gritty, sweaty characters provides an emotional connection. You have the deep south, a small town, unpretentious acting, ordinary people, (yes some are 'rednecks'), good character acting, old 70's car chases on dusty dirt roads, etc. Its just good fun in a setting and style that you just don't see anymore in films.
Samugor
Samugor
White Lightning is a terrific action/drama that tells the story of a hard-driving moonshiner named Gator McKlusky (Burt Reynolds) who is released from prison early in exchange for any help he can give the government with its case against his fellow moonshiners. Gator, however, has his own agenda and it has nothing to do with his altruistic nature. It seems that Sheriff J.C. Connors (Ned Beatty) of Bogen County is not only one of the biggest moonshiners in Arkansas, he's also responsible for killing Gator's brother. And Gator wants revenge.

One of the coolest things about White Lightning is that it presents Burt Reynolds as an actor at the top of his game. This was a Burt Reynolds who seemed to actually care about the final product and not just yucking it up with his buddies on screen. White Lightning was made before Burt became a clown, mugging for the camera. That's not to say there isn't any humor in White Lightning – it's just used judiciously. Burt is joined by phenomenal cast. In addition to Ned Beatty (who's perfect as the Sheriff), R.G. Armstrong, Bo Hopkins, Diane Lane, and Dabbs Greer give solid, memorable performances. In fact, I can't think of a single actor that bothered me. The movie was helped tremendously by the decision to film in rural Arkansas. I grew-up in the South and everything from the locations to the sweat dripping off Burt's chin had a feeling of authenticity. I've been to places like the old Kroger I spotted in the background and I sweat just like Burt in the oppressively hot Southern summers. It all felt real to me. Finally, the plot is just terrific, mixing in just the right amount of high speed car chases, brutal looking fight scenes, and dramatic conversations. It drew me in right from the start and held my attention throughout. Overall, it's a well-made, entertaining movie.
Berenn
Berenn
This movie is one of my all time favorite movies. This flick has it all, cool action, great car chases, awesome lingo and an engrossing story. It's a shame that this movie doesn't get more hype. This is definately the best of 70's "good-old-boys" movies. I really wish more people my age (mid 20's) would check this flick out, I'm sure they would enjoy it.
Kerahuginn
Kerahuginn
The Retro channel bills itself as the place where memories are made. Well this film brought back some memories. Not the good ole boy, or the corn likker, or the sweet Arkansas babes - it had all of those - but the memories of the town I lived in from the Sixth grade through High School.

White Lightening, starring Burt Reynolds as Gator McKlusky, was filmed in Benton, Arkansas. It was Saline County, not Bogen as the film states. It brought back memories of the Saline County Courthouse, where a lot of the action took place. Of course, I was off in Vietnam when they were filming, so I didn't get to see ole Burt.

This isn't quality film-making or dramatic acting, although it was rumored to be Steven Spielburg's directorial debut. I wonder what happened there.

Hey, it's OK for a rainy Saturday afternoon and it was a trip back home.
Doomwarden
Doomwarden
Being an old movie, when I first saw 'White Lightning' with Burt Reynolds, I thought it would be a little hard to pay attention to, considering I'm used to the movies of today. It was knowing personally about where it was filmed that made me interested to see it.

Filmed partly at the Tucker Penitentiary in Tucker, Arkansas, with a few of the correctional officers who worked there at the time as extras, was easy for me to see when I was hired at the Tucker Unit by the assistant warden. The grounds are the same and the prison itself has only been improved a bit. The barracks in which a scene of Reynolds was filmed are still there, as are the guard towers and even one of the officers who was an extra.

Overall, it was an excellent movie and Burt Reynolds had established himself as a Southern star.
Qumen
Qumen
I've lived in Arkansas for a while and I always enjoy watching this Movie. My cousin Susie is one of the unwedded Mother's in the movie! She was an extra! She has a pic of Burt Holding her in his arms! This movie is as southern as iced tea and dirt roads in the summertime!
Phain
Phain
I will watch this movie over and over one of Burt before his mustache era lol. But seriously its a great movie. Action,racing fast cars, fast women and my favorite line of all time came from this movie...shaky pudding pie lol that I still use to this day. Im 52. Bo Hopkins plays a really cool shine runner and his women is hot also. Matter of fact she is the one with the line ,shaky pudding pie , my kind of gal lol. Ned Beatie is also in it as a sadistic sheriff and he plays the part very good. He is cool talking southern boy that has the twang in his voice as well. Its the first in a line of two movies that are both great. So if you have seen this movie you really need to watch the second one. Back to back if possible. Well that's my small take on this film that I just had ta keep talking about it for 10 lines lol.
Twentyfirstfinger
Twentyfirstfinger
This movie is an all time favorite of mine from the drive-in days. Burt Renyolds was just beginning his #1 status as a draw at the movie theaters. The backdrop, the cars, the actors, the moonshine, all are

very real, believe it or not, to the way it was in the small southern towns of the 60's-70's. Moonshine was serious business, and who better to put a stop to the corruption it brought than Burt himself. Matt Clark plays the perfect role as a not-too-willing informer Burt relies on for inside information, and R.G. Armstrong is his usual best as a moonshiner in dire need of a shave. The soundtrack is catchy and the cars fast. Seems like everyone back then owned a Ford LTD with an illegal motor in it. All the same, it is a fun movie, and if you wanna see Burt at his "Good ol' Boy" best, this is a movie for you.
Vareyma
Vareyma
White Lightning is the first of two appearances Burt Reynolds made as Gator McKlusky, moonshiner with a mission. He's got a year to go on a rap for running illegal whiskey, but gets word of the death of his kid brother, arrested and later found drowned in a lake in another county. He decides to help the Feds get the corrupt good old boy sheriff who runs that county, Ned Beatty.

Of course that means going against tradition that southern folks have about cooperating with revenuers. One of Beatty's sideline enterprises is a nice partnership with R.G. Armstrong who's a crazy sadistic old shiner from the piney woods.

Beatty and Armstrong play a pair that was rapidly disappearing from the south because of the Civil Rights and Voting Rights Acts of the Sixties. They don't like the fact their world is changing one little bit. Long haired hippie types like Reynolds's brother apparently was, arouse their murderous ire as surely as Goodman, Schwerner and Chaney did.

White Lightning did a respectable business in the red state area of the USA and certainly was a nice boost to Burt Reynolds career. More than his fans will be pleased with it.
Alexandra
Alexandra
White Lightning is the kind of movie you can watch with a couple of your buddies while enjoying a cold one. We watched it again the other night (my second time seeing the movie) and its just a really good movie. You have to like Burt Reynolds, you have to be able to get past the stereotypical Southern image, and you have to be able to watch Ned Beatty without laughing (think Deliverance). If you can get through those three, then you'll like White Lightning.

It is a serious movie. There is far less humor than you're used to seeing out of Reynolds. And, thank God, there is no Dom Deluise! Have a Burt Reynolds night with your buddies. Rent "The Longest Yard", "Deliverance", "White Lightning" and "Smokey and the Bandit". You'll enjoy them all.
Xellerlu
Xellerlu
I'm a HUGE fan of Burt. I think a lot of his movies are great. This one shows the way the southern life was back in the '70s and proved Burt to be a good ol' southern boy. He did well in this movie along with the souped up car. It's not a high action flick like today's but I still like it better because it captured the much more simpler life they had and it's a fun movie to watch. I suggest you rent it.
Garr
Garr
Okay now...(checking to see if I have a "reddish tint" to my neck) I LOVE this one. It has everything you could possibly want from a 70s drive-in action flick. You got the man's man (yeah, I mean Burt) getting let out of Prison on the condition that he infiltrate the moonshiners and take down names in his little black book so he can help bring down the evil J.C. Conners (played to ignorant perfection by Ned Beatty).

Gator McClusky has just recieved some bad news, his brother Donnie was murdered and everyone seems to be playing dumb as to who actually did it. Gator's out for revenge now and no one is about to stop him. What ensues next is some wild car-chases, some good country music (loved it), a wise-cracking Bo Hopkins, some good ole fashioned fist-fights and some great one-liners. I liked the sequel and all (Burt directed), but this one has it beat.
Wire
Wire
Burt Reynolds should have stuck to movies like this! A typical redneck, crooked-cop hillbilly flick, it flows nicely with perfect casting, including the neglected Jennifer Billingsley, Matt Clark, and Bo Hopkins. A 6 out of 10. Best performance = Jennifer Billingsley. There was a sequel (GATOR) a few years later.

Although Burt was good in DELIVERANCE, this was more his fare (distinctly different that SMOKEY AND THE BANDIT) and he excelled at this type of character. Ms. Billingsley was also great in LADY IN A CAGE in the mid-1960's. Ned Beatty and R.G. Armstrong offer decent support in this Bogan County tale.
Mr_Mix
Mr_Mix
Burt Reynolds plays Gator McKlusky, a likable ex-convict just released from prison who helps the feds nab a corrupt small town sheriff. Laid-back Reynolds was often accused by critics of merely phoning these 'good ol' boy' performances in; true, he's on auto-pilot throughout. But in his day, Reynolds knew just how to make a low-key effort work well for himself. Ingratiating and handsome, Reynolds comes as close to winking at the audience as he can without breaking up; he seems to know these backwoods as well as any movie star, while director Joesph Sargent provides an easy pace and a sweaty ambiance which brings the South alive. Unfortunately, the story isn't much, and supporting actors Ned Beatty and Bo Hopkins overact (as usual). Diane Ladd is fine in a small part, and real-life daughter Laura Dern can be glimpsed in the background. Reynolds returned to this character for 1976's "Gator". *1/2 from ****
Varshav
Varshav
Burt in one of the roles that helped make him a 70's icon. This actually is a little better and slightly more intelligent than what is typical of this genre. Director Joseph Sargent put together some good action sequences and the film is always watchable. It even spawned a sequel "Gator' but that wasn't nearly as good.An OK time killer, no more.
Saithi
Saithi
I've gotta admit, "White Lightning" wasn't at all what I was expecting. You see the words, "Burt Reynolds", "car" and "South" and it evokes the awesomeness that is "Smokey and the Bandit". Just how it is. But this is more serious. Reynolds still wields the good ol' boy charm, but he also seethes as he seeks to avenge his brother's senseless death at the hands of a corrupt sheriff (Ned Beatty, one of the great fascist lawmen).

There's something about this movie that works. The sweaty southern time and place, the long-ago political climate, the brooding protagonist. There's just enough fun here with the car chases to balance out the bitter injustice.

7/10
Blackworm
Blackworm
Does anyone one know any information about the ending song that is played as the funeral procession goes down the street? I have been searching for the song for quite sometime now without any luck.There must be someone somewhere who might know this information. the song was written and performed so I think it possible to locate the info. It goes like, At the back door of hell, there's an old rusty bell. And it rings, Lord it rings, as loud as thunder. Way down under. I hope that there is someone who can help me with this seemingly impossible endeavor. It might be strange for someone to become so overcome by a simple ballad but I like the song a lot. Help me