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Bears
Grizzly (2014)
Movie
  • Director:
    Alastair Fothergill,Keith Scholey
  • Category:
  • Writer:
    Alastair Fothergill,Adam Chapman
  • Time:
    1h 18min
  • Budget:
    $5,000,000
  • Year:
    2014
In an epic story of breathtaking scale, Disneynature's new True Life Adventure "Bears" showcases a year in the life of a bear family as two impressionable young cubs are taught life's most important lessons. Set against a majestic Alaskan backdrop teeming with life, their journey begins as winter comes to an end and the bears emerge from hibernation to face the bitter cold. The world outside is exciting-but risky-as the cubs' playful descent down the mountain carries with it a looming threat of avalanches. As the season changes from spring to summer, the brown bears must work hard to find food-ultimately feasting at a plentiful salmon run-while staying safe from rival male bears and predators, including an ever-present wolf. "Bears" captures the fast-moving action and suspense of life in one of the planet's last great wildernesses-Alaska!
Casts
Credited cast:
John C. Reilly John C. Reilly - Narrator (voice)

Grizzly (2014)

Bears (2014) is the fifth theatrical release for Disneynature. The first four releases under the Disneynature label (Earth (2007), Océans (2009), African Cats (2011), and Chimpanzee (2012)) are among the top five highest grossing feature-length nature films of all time. Walt Disney was a pioneer in wildlife documentary film making, producing 13 True Life Adventure motion pictures between 1948 and 1960, including Seal Island (1948), Beaver Valley (1950), The Living Desert (1953), and Jungle Cat (1960). The films earned eight Academy Awards®.

Bears (2014) opened in theaters April 18, 2014, to celebrate Earth Day.

Other animals in this documentary are a common raven, sea gulls, a lone wolf, and salmon. In addition, it includes minor appearances of squirrels, bald eagles, golden eagles, American martens, red foxes, and deer.

Went Tyu
Went Tyu
Here's a family friendly movie that will be enjoyed by all ages. Outstanding cinematography takes you very up close and personal with a mother bear and her two cubs in their first year.

John C. Reilly narrates, sometimes as if for the blind. He is saying what is on the screen. The narration is a little too much when he speaks for the male cub. An excellent music track adds to the enjoyment.

You can't help but wonder how did they capture that action? Over the end credits there are behind the camera shots that show how some of the movie was made.

It is short, and there is nothing too scary for smaller children. The Bears make it through their first year, the salmon well that's a different story.
ndup
ndup
I was delighted to find "Bears". What was so amazing about this movie were the close-up shots of many personal moments for this bear family. I just wondered throughout the entire movie how the film makers could have this repertoire with these wild creatures. Being a pro photographer myself, I could tell that the lenses they used were not extremely long telephoto lenses. This was better, more personal than a National Geographic documentary. The images were so sharp and colorful, it just lead me to want to visit, or live, in Alaska. The panoramas were huge, majestic, post card perfect. The narrative was helpful; I needed to know what motivated the bears through their journey; the narrative answered that. Violence between bears was muted compared to what I know they can do to one another. So, this movie is safe for little children I feel. Yes, they eat Salmon fish in the river, but I eat Salmon fish too, on a plate. Did you know that bears live at the top of the peaks of mountains? I didn't know that. They carve themselves out of their hiding place from the very top of a high mountain! This movie goes into the details of a bears life from its infancy. So, your heart will be touched and warmed up by their cute behaviors. Your city life woes will all melt away when you follow them through all of the problems that bears encounter during a year's time. Yes, I do feel that "Sky", the mother bear, should be nominated for an Oscar. If Snow White and her 7 Dwarfs were winners for the Oscar, "Sky" & "Scout" & "Amber" should also be considered. This movie has its villains and its funny friends. DisneyNature is a wide eye opening presentation. There was applause from the audience at its conclusion. I felt that this movie "brought me back" to a good feeling after I had been "crashed" by a scifi movie I had seen earlier. "Bears" is good family entertainment, and as I said, it will transport you to lush, clear and clean adventure in Alaska. Now I understand why people live there.
Moogugore
Moogugore
Hello, I am from the Yukon Canada, and having seen Brown Bears in the wild, I was looking forward to viewing these wonderful creatures filmed by Disney Nature. I was looking forward with great excitement to seeing the Movie based on the movie trailer. However the Narration was at a preschool level, and yes i understand Disneys desire to appeal to family audience. However less narration and more overall scenery and how the scenes were filmed would have been enjoyable. Overall great Film except for narration, i will be enjoying the film once again on DVD with sound in mute mode, over and over as the bears are still the most majestic creatures.
Phain
Phain
A documentary very easy to watch by kids and the young at heart who love nature.

It conveys the harsh challenges of the first year of life of a brown bear family in the Alaskan peninsula.

Parents or other responsible adults may face some tough questions about additional details on what it's not shown by naturally curious children.

If at the end the viewer is left amazed at how the making of this feature was even possible, just stay a while longer through all the credits.
Flash_back
Flash_back
I watched Disney's "Bears," during the opening weekend. I support the Earth Day films they make each year. Of the ones I have seen in the past ("Oceans," "African Cats," and "Chimpanzee,"), this one is not the best one they have done, but it is still enjoyable. The film is a tad slow, and at 77 minutes, you get the sense the filmmakers had to stretch the movie out to even reach 77 minutes. The end credits showed a lot of the filming, and I got the sense it could have been longer.

The good things about the film is watching the bear cubs play and frolic and their journey with their mother. The film lacks a lot of breathtaking panoramas and scenes considering it is a nature film, but the scenes showing all of the Alaskan mountains are gorgeous. I like John C. Reilly, but to be honest, his narration did not exactly add to the presentation.
OwerSpeed
OwerSpeed
We all have heard about the big bad bear or seen a lovable teddy bear, but do we really know much about these hibernating creatures. In the movie Bears you are taken right up close to see how they come into the world and fight all the obstacles. A mama bear and her two cubs come out and fight for survivor. There are some amazing shots and really takes you front and center in a bears life. You soon realize that these cuddly creatures are softies but can be really tough. I loved this film and it makes me be more in aw in the wonders of nature and the obstacles that all of god's creatures have to over come to survive. A perfect film for kids of all ages or anyone that just want to learn more about bears. The funny man John C. Reilly serves the perfect narrator of some of the most important lessons a bear needs to know.
GAZANIK
GAZANIK
I love Disney's Nature movies! They get SO close and it's amazing! The crew on these kinds of films do such an excellent job. These films are always so beautiful. I believe that Disney's Oceans was just documentary without extras, but in this film, the bears have names and you get little jokes with it. (Little funnies = extras). I enjoy the song that Olivia Holt sings for the movie also. I want Disney Nature to do films on all the animals lol :). Holy Crap! Magnus, the alpha bear, was SO HUGE!!!! They said he weighed 1,000+ pounds. Wow. I am looking forward to seeing Disney's Monkey Kingdom. I haven't seen Chimpanzees, but it is probably just as great as the others.
watchman
watchman
Beautiful-looking documentary from Disney. It's harmless fluff. There's no footage of bears killing other animals (besides fish) and the few bear fights they show result in no bloodshed. I'm not sure why it was even made as you can find such nature documentaries on television all the time. Still, it is pleasant to watch. There is a somewhat annoying narration from John C. Reilly. I get that Disney wanted this to appeal to kids so having a comedian with a silly voice is understandable from a marketing standpoint. But the documentary does have serious moments and Reilly pretty much ruins all of those. It's worth watching if you love animals and nature footage. But be prepared for it to be slow-moving and a little too cutesy at times. If you have kids, they will likely enjoy it more than you do.
Beydar
Beydar
Disney has been putting out a nature documentary on Earth Day for the past several years in order to raise awareness and funds for wildlife conservation. It's an extremely noble ambition, creating docs that are appropriate for children to help raise a generation of environmentally conscious people. Unfortunately in their latest, what we get is the Disney-fication of natural science. Instead of just giving us stunning visuals and fascinating facts, we're force fed a personified, half-hearted narrative, leaving Bears to be neither entertaining nor informative. Bears follows a mother and her two newborn cubs as they live out their first year, looking for food and trying to survive the dangers of the world. This mostly amounts to walking around. Animals strolling along beautiful scenery can be nice for a 30 minute TV episode or short doc, but not for a full length movie. The movie is somewhat aware of this and tries to construct a story to fill the space, but it's syrupy in its sweetness. While Reilly does a decent and mildly funny job with the voice-over, the script is too on-the-nose and corny. Worst of all, I'm not sure it's wise to personify animals by making them heroes (bears) or villains (wolves/bad bears) when their natural state is engaging enough. As a fan of Earth and Oceans, I think I expected more from Bears. Our world is a wondrous and complex place, and we get that in Bears with some awe-inspiring cinematography and some engaging natural moments. Nonetheless, while Bears is undeniably gorgeous, unfortunately it's also undeniably dull.
Amis
Amis
I was surprised how tame and dull this movie was, even for Disney. I get it's a G-rated film, but nothing dramatic, thrilling or suspenseful happens in the entire 77 minutes of the film. Disney is known for killing off a parent in their films or something horrific, bad or sad usually happens to make us adults tear up when watching the film, but not in this one - unless you are a vegetarian. We see salmon, mussels, clams and eels killed off like they feel no pain, but nothing major happens to any of the bears in the film. They act like something horrible is about to happen, but cut to more scenery shots then back to the bears and it was all much ado about nothing.

John C. Reilly's narration is very cute, but also very over-the-top. He narrates things that aren't even happening or he over-narrates quite obvious things we are watching on screen. The bear cubs, Amber and Scout are adorable. They describe this film as a fast-paced thrill ride, but it's nothing close to that. It's very slow moving with heavy narration.

Disney normally has some adult humor for adults watching the films that go above the kids heads, but not in this film. What you see is what you get in this film. Safe for kids of any age. Expect a sequel.
Naa
Naa
"Bears" is one of a series of documentaries produced by Disney's "Disney Nature" division, and this one focuses on a mother bear and her two cubs, following them over the course of a few seasons. It begins as they awaken from winter hibernation, and watches as the mother tries to protect her offspring and show them how to obtain food, which sometimes looks to be in short supply. There are also dangers to overcome, such as the threats posed by bigger and meaner bears, a rogue wolf, and nature itself.

Overall, a good if not great film. It's marked by exemplary filmmaking, with top notch photography of many beautiful Alaska locations. It benefits from an engaging cast of animal characters. Although, like so many things aiming for a family audience, it does tend to get awfully precious. This viewer thought that giving the animals character names like "Sky", "Scout", and "Amber" was overly cute, and the film IS manipulative, to be sure, with some overstated music. Actor John C. Reilly recites the narration, and while his recitation is amiable enough, the stuff he has to utter can be incredibly goofy. "Hey, Mom! Wait up!"

This viewer would imagine the other Disney Nature documentaries pretty much follow the same formula, although the intentions are certainly admirable. Any film that aims at young viewers and attempts to teach them respect for Mother Nature and the animal kingdom is alright in his book.

Seven out of 10.
Modar
Modar
Great little story that shows the hardships of motherhood in nature. The animals have names and there is a slight narrative thread with some of the recurring bears and other predators.

The movie features plenty of beautiful shots of nature be it the breathtaking Alaskan Alps or the beauty and colours of a meadow. You will also see breathtaking sights like the best avalanche ever filmed and some intense bear fights and close calls. There's also an amazing scene with an eagle being a dick to a falcon. The movie also features a slew of different animals like Wolves, Foxes, Ravens, Eagles, Falcons, Rock Eels, etc.

The movie does have 2 major flaws. First is John C. Reilly. He never really seems all that into it and almost every attempt at humor falls flat. Also his monotone voice when explaining things gets pretty dull and boring. Secondly a lot of the film seems to be at 0.5 speed. Not slo-mo but very close and most times it's just unneeded and it detract from what's happening.

This has been a green review.
Zovaithug
Zovaithug
Reviewed by: Dare Devil Kid (DDK)

Rating: 4/5 stars

Disneynature has brought us some amazing documentaries in the past, including "African Cats" and "Chimpanzee". If there's one thing you can count on from these films, it's that they are absolutely stunning to watch, and their latest project, "Bears", is no exception. Following a year in the life of a brown bear (Sky) and her two cubs (Scout and Amber), we watch as they emerge from their den and go on an incredible journey for food that has them facing such dangers as avalanches, wolves, and even other alpha-male bears. It all comes down to a battle for survival as Sky desperately tries to find enough food to provide for her cubs to carry them through the next hibernation.

Narrated by Oscar-nominated actor John C. Reilly, "Bears" is a touching documentary that just goes to show how sometimes films with the simplest themes make for the most engaging experiences. It also manages to get quite tense in places; frequent long-shot vistas of fields and waterways harbor a succession of threats, which are freely milked for suspense.

There's not a whole lot of plot to be found here aside from following these bears from spot to spot on their quest for food, and yet, the documentary provides plenty of thrills as they come up against a number of obstacles. From the very start, you can't help but root for them on their difficult journey that has them traveling from the high peaks of the Alaskan peninsula to the shallow streams where salmon mass in great numbers. All the while, we're treated to the gorgeous backdrop of the Alaskan wilderness, made all the more amazing by the dazzling cinematography. Disneynature has once again gone above and beyond to bring us this footage, spending two years and braving several precarious moments capturing over 400 hours of it. Whittling that down to just 78 minutes must have been a herculean task, but in the end, it's wonderful to see that it was worth all the hard effort that went into it. An early avalanche sequence and Myriad shots involving a salmon hunt are particularly impressive. "Bears" is a visual experience through and through, one that offers eye-popping delights at every turn.

Not without a few contrivances as it caters to younger audiences, "Bears" is nonetheless an earnest, adorable real-life adventure. Despite the bracing beauty of the wilderness, and the respite provided by cubs at play, the film is primarily a sobering treatise on survival, narrated from the perspective of a family of three bears, giving their plight for survival a sense of sincere thematic heft. The only drawback of this visually brilliant, highly engrossing documentary is that it aims to be too kid-friendly at times, and downplays some of the harsher realities of bear life. But that doesn't take away much from what is undoubtedly an entertaining display for nature movie fans, animal lovers, and anybody in general who enjoys a good documentary.

With its touching story, beautiful scenery, and stunning camera- work, "Bears" becomes another worthwhile documentary in the Disneynature library. Kids and adults alike will be drawn into the plight of Sky and her cubs as they trek across the Alaskan wilderness in search of nourishment while facing down whatever stands in their way.
Legend 33
Legend 33
John C. Reilly narrates this Disney nature documentary about Sky, a female brown bear, and her two cubs, Scout and Amber, in Alaska. They climb out of their snowbound den and traverse mountains to greener pastures. It's a year in their lives. They scavenge for food and watch for predators. The big feast comes with the salmon run.

This has all the great Disney nature cinematography. It looks beautiful although the slow motion can linger a little too long. I'm less convinced about the Reilly narrations. His casual speaking voice is too colloquial sometimes. It's mostly fine except for the bears' voices which comes off a little sarcastic. There are stretches missing in the journey which could have added to the drama. There isn't much film about being lost in the woods for two weeks. That could have been great darkness before the dawn. The movie isn't that long and Sky's shocking thin appearance is jarring in its disconnection. That could have added some depth to the desperation. This is fine for the G-rated nature films for the kids.
Uafrmaine
Uafrmaine
The photography deserves superlatives that haven't been bastardized, cheapened and ground down into nothing, but I don't know any. So, simply, the imagery is just stunning. John C. Reilly as narrator was a weak choice and his narration is definitely geared to entertain young folk, but it is good-natured enough to be excused, although the movie would have worked just fine without any narration at all. As it is, he provides all of the anthropomorphic fantasy you expect in a Disney flick. "Chimpanzee" still stands out for me as the pinnacle of Disney Nature (anthropomorphic fantasy) films.
Vizil
Vizil
I imagine that when Disney launched their DisneyNature movie department, some people expected them to produce nature documentaries chock-full of saccharine, corny sentiment, with animals presented basically as four-footed people with fur. While DisneyNature's "Bears" doesn't completely avoid that anthropomorphic expectation, it is surprisingly largely realistic and comprehensive in its portrayal of a mother grizzly bear named Sky and her two cubs, the rambunctious, independent boy bear Scout, and the more cautious "mamma's girl" Amber. The film begins in a winter mountain den, where Sky is nursing her newborns.

As spring struggles to break forth, the cubs have developed enough to leave the den. Skye then proceeds to lead them over majestic mountain scenery to plains and coastal lowlands to find food – especially the bear mecca Golden Pond swarming with salmon that have migrated from the sea to lay their eggs and die. The three bears' goal in life is to eat enough, especially fat and protein, to put on enough weight to hibernate through another winter.

"Bears" chronicles the first year of these three bears' lives and the adventures and obstacles they encounter on their way to their promised land. They meet two male bears, the sneaky rogue Chinook and the lordly, territorial giant Magnus, both willing to make a snack of Scout and Amber. The bears also meet a solitary light-colored wolf named Tanaka, who would also like to take a bite out of the cubs. Sky has her paws full defending her cubs from these predators, even daring to tackle Magnus in a ferocious fight. She also has to make sure the mischievous Scout doesn't wander too far away and get lost. Sky, Scout, and Amber have to be careful not to be swept out to sea as they dig for clams. They have to find a safe, salmon- fishing spot along the river on the way to the pond, away from other fishing bears. Most importantly, they need to find Golden Pond to harvest the fatty salmon and pack on enough pounds to survive another winter. Clearly, these three bears' lives are no fairy tale. Will they succeed in their trek? Well, this IS a Disney movie after all.

Again, "Bears" should be commended for showing how bears really live and interact and mostly resisting the temptation to make them too human. Every so often the narrator, John C. Reilly ("Stepbrothers", "Ricky Bobby: Talladega Nights", "Wreck-It Ralph") gives in to this temptation and makes the cubs seem like little kids (e.g. "Wait for me, Mom!" "He's got his game on.") but his narration is mostly otherwise straightforward and informative. We learn about the bears' diet (including grass), their dexterous claws (used to pry open clams), their acutely sensitive noses, their fishing techniques (including grabbing salmon in mid-air), and how a mother bear protecting her cubs is the most terrifying creature in nature. Although "Bears" does show some fierce animal brawls and attacks and salmon being eaten, these scenes are muted enough to merit the "G" rating. Not least important, the natural cinematography is stunningly magnificent. During the end credits, we witness the hazards the daring cameramen endured to get close enough to the bears and other creatures to film them.

Therefore, I think "Bears" is an exciting, suitable, and accurately educational nature film for all people ages 7 and up. Even for people, like myself, who have seen more than their share of "National Geographic" wildlife documentaries, "Bears" reinforces the harshness, rawness, splendor, and grandeur of nature. It may even convince the hidden environmentalist in all of us that bears and other wild animals richly deserve our respect and protection.
Tejar
Tejar
One of the latest Disneynature's documentary ventures. There's nothing wrong to call it a grizzly version of 'To the Arctic'. Because both films are about the mother bears and their new born cubs' first year of survival in the wilderness, but the differences are the fur and habitat. Shot in Alaskan coast side, the film crew followed the bear family for one circle of a year's season to capture the beginning of the life journey of newborn cubs with their mother.

Like the Disney films famous for fairy tales and children friendly, Disneynature films as well not too far behind. Their films are not like we watch on Animal planet and Nationa Geography, the uncut and harsh version of animals' survival in the jungle. But a cute and enjoyable little epic tale. This film was narrated by our own jolly fellow John C. Reilly. Some of his lines were too good for kids and family, I mean comical. Like other Disneynature films is a must see for children. Hope along with kids, the adult would have a nice time.

8/10
Rigiot
Rigiot
Bears (2014): Dir: Alastair Fothergill, Keith Scholey / Narrator: John C. Reilly: One of the very best of Disney Nature documentary films. Since the release of the very entertaining Earth, Disney has released such engaging films as Oceans, African Cats and Chimpanzee. These are all educational films with effective narrations to engage younger audiences on wildlife issues. Now we are given a glimpse of one of North Americas most prized species in grizzly bears. It begins in the snowy mountains where a mother bear awakens from hibernation with two cubs. They begin a long journey down the mountain to the meadows where other bears roam about. While the cubs look about with great curiosity they are unaware of the dangers around them. For one there is two massive male bears in a heated battle for food and territory. One of them even pursues the two cubs, which pits mother bear and a brutal battle to defend them. Another problem arises when a gray wolf stalks from a distance but mother bear isn't long running it off. It becomes apparent as summer stretches on that she needs salmon so to store up enough fat to feed her cubs for the next winter. John C. Reilly narrates and seems to have fun while directors Alastair Fothergill and Keith Scholey give viewers awesome scenery and wildlife footage. The scene at the golden pond features a bear's paradise as several bears gather for an easy fill of salmon. What viewers are left with is a vision of bears that emphases the struggles of raising cubs and preparing for another hibernation in the mountains. Score: 10 / 10
Vudojar
Vudojar
I admit I was not familiar with the Disneynature brand, until one day I purchased a Disney blu-ray disk on which there was a trailer for "Bears". The trailer impressed me so much, that when I saw the "Bears" blu-ray disk, it was no brainer to buy it.

We just watched it last night, the whole family. The movie it a total triumph of technology in every way, so if you are an audio- and videophile, this disk is simply a must-have. First we begin with breath- taking views of nature in high-definition. Everything we saw was a pure honey for the eye - things we could not imagine to see on a screen when I was a kid. The movie uses a combination of different filming techniques for showing different sceneries, starting with aerial breath- taking landscapes of the Alaskan mountains, amazingly shot close-ups of different animals and wonderful slow-motions of swimming salmons.

Unfortunately I cannot say very much for the audio, as my two-years-old kid was making too much noise while we watched and also sometimes there was a narrator voice, however there was a pleasurable sound, especially I liked very much how the water and the footsteps in the shallow waters were recorded. Kudos also for the stone-falling and the claw-scratched mussels sounds.

As for the movie itself, kudos for Disney for few things. First, as this is a family movie, they managed very well to get rid of the violent scenes - animal fights were gently censored and only few delicate scenes were shown. Second, the bloody scenes were censored - there were almost no blood shown in the entire movie, with only very few exceptions - I noticed just one scene where a bear caught a salmon, but this scene was not really bloody. In general it is still appropriate movie for the whole family. Then we come to the story, which of course in a 100% Disney style was told very well, with both tension, some drama, action, humour and finally a nice happy ending, even with a moral of the story. The main keywords however, are "cute" and "heroes".

I cannot miss to mention, that this must be a well budgeted movie, as they seem to had plenty of good resources to use, both technical and human talents. The result is that we have the chance to see a movie about the brown bears, showing their life in a way only few other movies succeeded (like "The Bear" 1988). So for what I paid for this disk, it worth every cent, as I had a wonderful experience watching it.

I recommend this movie to every one, regardless the age. I will definitely look for the old Disneynature movies and I cannot wait for the "Monkey Kingdom" blu-ray disk to come out!
Balladolbine
Balladolbine
This Disney nature film, narrated by John C. Reilly, is the story of the first year of life in a family of three brown bears. Sky the mother bear previously dug her winter den high in a nearly inaccessible mountain in Alaska (Katmai National Park) and gave birth to her two cubs. Now it is time for her to leave her den and move her offspring down the snow-capped mountains. It is a rather arduous trek for cubs Scout (the adventurous one) and Amber (the more practical one). The trip is exciting but lurks with danger. Snow that sheltered the small family in the winter now becomes a deadly enemy in early spring, especially because of avalanches. And mother soon has to begin feeding to make milk for her young ones. Down at the Alaskan coast the snow has melted and the land is green. At a meadow there are other bears; they eat grass, their salad until they can get their real food: tasty salmon. There is an occasional fish. The dominant bear in the area is the behemoth Magnus, who at one thousand pounds is three times larger than Sky. Then there is the outcast bear Chinook, who was banished from the meadow by Magnus. Sky has to remain alert for these rival bears and even for predators.

In the mudflats near the water are some clams. There is peril for the cubs when the tides return, as they can be separated from land. Then there is the clash with Chinook, but the cubs escape. At another spot up the coast there are some salmon. It is now midsummer. The three bears leave the meadow and head for shore. Magnus steals a fish from Chinook. A new danger is the wolf, Tikani, who eyes the cubs but Sky drives him away.

Sky still needs to eat large quantities of salmon before summer's end, or else she will not have enough milk stored for the cubs during winter hibernation. When salmon seem to appear in larger numbers, Tinaki tries to grab a cub while Sky gathers fish, but is again repelled. After two weeks the main school of salmon, finally used to fresh water, swim upstream in order to spawn (sometimes a 30-mile trip against current!). In calm, shallow streams the salmon lay their eggs, but Sky still has difficulty in finding enough fish. When the rains come the water rises and the fish can really move. At the Great Falls the salmon finally gather in huge numbers. Then a raven caws, seeming to signal to Sky the whereabouts of the Golden Pond, her destination. At last the bears can finally eat their fill. Even Tinaki the wolf awkwardly learns how to fish and keeps away from the cubs.

In the late summer Scout and Amber have new winter coats. With the seasonal changes it is time for the bear family to return to the high country and prepare their dens for the long cold season and hibernation. The closing credits highlight the film crew and the animal stars. This is a Disney nature film, so you know it is a good one for the entire family. And the cinematography is of Disney's distinctive high quality. Enjoy this one!
Qwne
Qwne
Bears as long-nailed mammals, have always been portrayed to be deadly and menacing in countless movies (1997's The Edge comes to mind). In 2014's Bears (the cuddly documentary I'm about to review), they instead come across as harmless and adorable. For 78 minutes, you become interested and involved in their sort of humorous way of life. So by that token, this is a film that pretty much anyone can enjoy. Kids will eat it up the most even though the proceedings hint towards a replica of a classroom film strip. As for the way it was shot, I gotta say it's impressive. The director or directors probably gathered a ton of footage, had to endure massive amounts of editing (to come up with a cohesive story line), and then when everything was cut, asked narrator John C. Reilly to step in and do his thing. Oh, and I'm thinking that everyone involved also had to worry about their own safety. Bears are still for lack of a better word, utterly dangerous if you get too close.

Featuring a dandy of an opening shot (of a bear mother giving birth to her wide-eyed kin), helmed by not one but two directors (Alastair Fothergill and Keith Scholey), having vague similarities to March of the Penguins, and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, Bears follows female grizzly bear Sky taking her newly born cubs to trek across Alaska's Katmai National Park. It's summer time and Sky's family along with every other group of bears, is searching for food (the parable of these caniforms as consumers is really sledgehammered here). Along the way, Sky has to use her maternal instincts to protect her two young ones from avalanches (in early April), antagonistic food mongers (portrayed by another bear named Chinook and a seething wolf named Tikanni), and the threat of not being ready for winter hibernation. The film is G rated but has a few attack scenes between the large mammals. These shortened scenes aren't too intense and shouldn't dissuade a young child from taken in a viewing.

Things I didn't know about the bear species before seeing this documentary: 1. they make friends with birds like the raven when gathering their food supply (who knew?). 2. bears have a sense a smell that is simply off the charts. They put bloodhounds to shame. 3. bears are for some reason, frightened by wolves even though they are twice their size. 4. call me naive but I never knew that bears liked salmon so darn much. The mother bear has to eat enough of this fish to fatten up for her cubs (so they can make it through the hibernation period mentioned earlier). The only other foods bears eat are I guess, grass and mussels. For them, these forms of nourishment are sooooo boring!

Interestingly fun factoids aside, Bears is without a doubt, a great looking flick. Channeling a little residue a la Terrence Malick, a lot of its shots are slow motion close-ups of said species, a couple of impressive time-lapse sequences, and views of breathtaking cinematography via the wide open, Alaskan wilderness. The film score is a mixture of country, contemporary, and pop rock music genres (the familiar "Home" by Philip Phillips is featured). And said score evokes in equal measures, feelings of happiness, despair, and goofy playfulness. The only human element pertaining to Bears is the narration by veteran actor John C. Reilly. It's a hoot and a real breath of fresh air. He plays to the audience in a happy-go-lucky sort of way while at times, speaking for the furry guys themselves (it's as if he's doing their voices if they could only speak real English). Overall, his narrative technique is perfect and let's face it, we could all use a break from the more serious Morgan Freeman.

In conclusion, this summer of 2014 release with its fair share of educational fodder, does sort of wear out its welcome at the 1 hour mark. However, it's a beautifully shot, delightfully passive documentary done in the classic documentary style (as with most docudramas, the slow motion nature phenomenas are in abundance here). Bears will at certain points, warm the cockles of your heart. Result: A "bearably" good 3 stars.
Faegal
Faegal
** SPOILER ALERT ** From the beginning of the film with the close-up shots of the mother bear and her cubs to the end where the bears return to the mountains to hibernate yet again for another winter, the portrayal of how the mother bears look out for her two young cubs and how they survive the year is interestingly narrated.

While some might feel that certain aspects of the narration may feel clichéd, the voice-over for the bears are interestingly done and humorously executed.

This film is family-friendly and is suitable for adults and children alike. It's also educational and many values are taught over the course of this film.

One of the most beautifully directed films for this year!
Buzalas
Buzalas
The music, John C. Reilly's narration, scenery, EVERYTHING about it was perfect. It was so cute the way the narration sort of 'anthropomorphized' the bears' behavior. I watch a lot of nature programs. This was so uplifting and enjoyable. It was realistic as far as what Skye had to do to ensure that her cubs, as well as she, would survive. Including other animals like the wolf, the raven, made it even more interesting and substantive. In addition, being able to see the actual photographers and film crew during the credits at the end makes the viewer realize how much effort went into filming this.Absolutely fantastic film!
Jaberini
Jaberini
"Bears" is an okay choice for a family audience looking for a nature documentary. Adults, either by themselves or with other adults, may find a few problems with it. For one thing, while this adult was wanting to learn more about bears, the movie is less educational than you might think. The documentary certainly shows over and over that bears have to constantly struggle in the wilderness, but I wanted to learn more than just that. Also, the documentary on occasion suffers from some juvenile dialogue. But I think the reason for both of those problems is that the filmmakers were trying to appeal to kids in the audience. Had the documentary been more informative and more sober in its narration, kids would probably get bored quickly. And I will admit that the documentary has some strengths. The photography is stunning, there are some exciting moments, and I will admit I was never bored. And at 77 minutes, the movie does not outstay its welcome. It's not the best nature documentary I've seen, but it's far from the worst.
Shem
Shem
It's really amazing documentary movie I have ever seen. The most amazing part I like most is the closest shot they taken. It's really amaze to realize how they do that! The part of the movie is really helpful for the people to enjoy and understand how bears live, eat or grow. Love this movie.