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Fox Pop (1942) Online HD

Fox Pop
Fox Pop (1942)
Movie
Hearing that silver foxes are all the rage in high society, a fox paints himself silver and gets himself trapped, finding out too late that it's only his fur anyone is interested in.
Casts
Uncredited cast:
Mel Blanc Mel Blanc - Fox / Crow / Trapper / Dogs (voice) (uncredited)
Robert C. Bruce Robert C. Bruce - Radio Announcer (voice) (uncredited)
Tedd Pierce Tedd Pierce - Various (voice) (uncredited)

Fox Pop (1942)

Included on the Warner DVD of Kings Row (1942)

LadyShlak
LadyShlak
This cartoon is beautifully done and hilarious. A fox makes a monumental error when he hears that silver foxes are highly prized, not realizing that only the skin is prized, not the fox it's attached to. This is one occasion that proves ignorance is decidedly not bliss! The fox gets into various situations and Chuck Jones makes this cartoon a spoof as well as a proof that jumping to conclusions can be a very foolish thing to do indeed. The opening and closing scenes are perfect. Most highly recommended.
Meztihn
Meztihn
I love it! It is a great short and one of my favorite cartoons from Chuck Jones' early years of directing at Warner Bros. Chuck Jones is my favorite animator along with Max Fleischer, and also I love foxes. But you know, I thought there is no such thing as a silver fox. I thought they are mystical, fantasy creatures like flying-horses, dragons, mermaids and such; but I guess I was wrong.

I love how the fox is depicted in a very effective, sinister silhouette as he sneaks up on an unsuspecting farmhouse; that was great stuff! And I also love the escape scene too. Excellent work, Mr. Jones, we will miss you.
Fhois
Fhois
It is always interesting to see Warner Brothers cartoons featuring characters that are not the classic ones we know and love and are iconic in animation history.

'Fox Pop' is a little gem and deserving of more recognition. Chuck Jones is a favourite and while 'Fox Pop' is not quite one of his masterpieces but it is still wonderful, one of his better cartoons not to feature any of the iconic Looney Tunes characters and one of his most under-appreciated. The story is slight, but has a dark, mature tone dealt with intelligently. The humour is mild and sporadic, but this turned out to be a good choice considering the subject matter.

The cartoon couldn't have started and ended more perfectly, the fox's big error and jumping to conclusions is beautifully done and has a message of how conclusion jumping has consequences that makes its point without resorting to preaching and the escape is memorable.

On a visual level, 'Fox Pop' is beautifully animated, being colourful and inventively detailed with smooth and fluid character designs. Carl Stalling's music is lushly and cleverly orchestrated, with lively and energetic rhythms and fits very well indeed. Stalling always had an unequalled knack for not only having music that adds to the action but enhances it, that's the case here.

Even in slightly subdued form, Jones' style is still distinctive and can be found. The fox character is a relatable lead character and Mel Blanc's vocal characterisations are as ever definitively exuberant. Robert C Bruce and Tedd Pierce also excel.

In conclusion, a little under-appreciated gem. 10/10 Bethany Cox
Grillador
Grillador
. . . "Good Ol' Days," given that most of FOX POP consists of a naive lupine traitor relating his downfall to the Crow of Death by means of an animated flashback. The title character is yet another time-traveling avatar being used by Warner Bros. to warn us against the Advent of Red Commie KGB Chief Vlad "The Mad Russian" Putin's White House Sock Puppet, Don Juan Rump, and how to handle Rump and his fellow Fifth Columnist High Treason Enabling Traitors should worse come to worse. (The latter are depicted here as the gangster foxes caged up on Death Row at the "Sterling Silver Fox Farm;" the duplicitous dupe protagonist is a RED fox who has PAINTED himself to match the thugs of the Confederate Gray Nazi Repug Party after being recruited by Putin's mentor for grooming as a true MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE while a reform school juvenile delinquent.) As anyone can imagine, now that the remaining shambles of our once-great nation is overseen by Rump and Putin's pick for Secretary of State (Rex "Exxon Valdez" Tillerson, the mass killer whom a national consensus of experts hold most responsible for the untold number of environmental murders occurring as I type due to Exxon's Global Warming Gift, Hurricane Harvey), Warner suggests that the only way to out-fox the PutinRumpTillerson Fox Cartel involves axes.
Xangeo
Xangeo
Fox Pop is featured on a video that I used to watch as a kid. I enjoyed it back when I was little simply because it was a cartoon. Now as an adult, I see it, and things are much more clear to me now. I don't think I really understood the concept of a fox fur coat and the deadly demise that was facing the unsuspecting fox. This is really a piece of dark comedy. Some may really like that, but I on the other hand, didn't find hardly anything funny with this cartoon.

I think I chuckled once when the fox imagined women walking around wearing live foxes around the necks, but that was it. It's kind of disheartening to see this fox try to get caught in a dangerous trap and to almost face death. I know this is a cartoon, and I don't mean to take this too seriously, but it's just not the type of cartoon I enjoy. I also don't get why the crows did what they did at the end of the short. Give me a good Donald Duck cartoon instead!

My IMDb Rating: 3/10
Buzatus
Buzatus
Now that I'm old enough to understand what a lot of the classic Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies cartoons were saying, it's a good thing that I'm only seeing some of them for the first time. "Fox Pop" is a case in point. This one portrays a red-white fox hearing on the radio that foxes are quite popular among high society women, and so he deliberately gets himself caught in a trap, only to then learn that it's fox skins that the rich women want.

This was one of many indications that Warner Bros. cartoons weren't targeted at children; they preceded feature films in movie theaters where adults could see them. This one specifically has a rather dark subject matter, with only mild humor (would it be possible to use slapstick humor to show this topic?).

Anyway, it's an OK cartoon, but understand that it shows some tense things. Worth seeing.